Michigan State Hospitals Statistical Report, 1931-1934

Dublin Core

Title

Michigan State Hospitals Statistical Report, 1931-1934

Subject

Psychiatric hospitals.

Description

Tabulations covering twenty years of growth of institutions under State Hospital Commission, together with detailed statistics on population, admissions and discharges during four years from 1931 through 1934. Prepared by State Welfare Department, 1935.

From the Foreword: "Since 1915 there have been no periodic reports published covering the details of the operation of the several state hospitals which are providing care and treatment for the mentally ill of this state. Special reports have been published in this interval, one by Barrett in 1927, being a survey of mental diseases in the different hospitals, and one by Haskell in 1928, pointing out the needs to properly care for the mentally sick in Michigan."

Creator

Michigan State Welfare Department.

Source

Original document held by Traverse Area District Library.

Publisher

Michigan State Welfare Department.

Date

1935

Contributor

Michigan State Welfare Commission.

Rights

This document is in the public domain.

Relation

See other reports from the Board of Trustees at various institutions in the "Traverse City State Hospital" Digital Collection.

Format

PDF.

Language

English.

Type

Document.

Identifier

MSH0010

Coverage

Michigan, United States.

PDF Text

Text

f
STATE K.V
MEDICAL LIBR.-'

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS
STATISTICAL REPORT

INSANE-MENTAL DEFECTIVES-EPILEPTICS

STATE WELFARE DEPARTMENT
1935

KALAMAZOQ
S T A T E HOSPITAL
MEDICAL LIBRARY

M I C H I G A N

STATE H O S P I T A L S

S T A T I S T I C A L

REPORT

Tabulations covering twenty years of growth of institutions under State Hospital Commission, together with detailed statistics on population, admissions and discharges
during four years from 1931 through 1934.
*##•»****

Prepared By
STATE WELFARE DEPARTMENT
1935

STATE H O S P I T A L
M E D I C A L LIBRAE?

F O R E W O R D

Since 1915 there have been no periodic reports published
covering the details of the operation of the several state
hospitals which are providing care and treatment for the mentally ill of this state. Special reports have been published
in this interval, one by Barrett in 1927, being a survey of
mental diseases in the different hospitals, and one by Haskell
in 1928, pointing out the needs to properly care for the mentally sick in Michigan.
In 1931 the State Hospital Commission inaugurated the
plan of collecting and compiling detailed information relating
to each patient in the various state hospitals on a type of
punched card for use in a mechaiical tabulator. The work of
collection and recording these data has been going on in the
State Welfare Department during the past four years, and the
resulting accumulation of records, relating to the state hospital population, is now more extensive and varied than has hitherto been available.
The accompanying report has been prepared for the purpose
of indicating the development that has taken place since the
year 1915 in the activities of these institutions, now under
the State Hospital Commission, showing increases in population,
investments and expenditures. Also this report provides detailed studies of admissions, deaths and discharges of patients over
the four year period from 1931 to 1934 inclusive. The work of
preparing and compiling tabulations included in this report has
been directed by Gilbert !<. Haigh, Statistician for the State
Welfare Department, under the guidance and supervision of the
Statistical Committee of the State Association of Medical Superintendents.
George P. Inch, M*D.
Albert M. Barrett, M.D.
Robert L. Dixon, M.D.
Robert H. Haskell, M.D.
Perry C. Robertson, M.D.
Statistical Committee

Honorable Fred L. Woodworth, Director
State Welfare Department

S T A T E

W E L F A R E

C O M M I S S I O N

Rev. Fr. John R. Day, Chairman

Three Oaks

Mrs. Ufa. G. Rice

Houghton

Mrs. John J. Porter

East Jordan

Mr. Chas. P. Winegar

Grosse Polnte

Mr. Nathan Shapero

Detroit

Mrs. Pern Smith Hammond, Secretary
Pred L. Woodworth, Director

STATE WELFARE DEPARTMENT

TABLE OP CONTENTS
Page
Description of Institutions
.
Deportation Report
Outpatient Clinic Report
Inventories, Investments and Expenditures (tables I to IV)

7
8
8
10

I - STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS
Population, Admissions and Deaths 1915-1935 (tables V to VII)
Capacities of Hospitals (tables VIII and IX)
Hospital Needs in Future Years
Charts of Population and Capacities
Movement of Mental Patient Population (table X)
Patients in Mental Hospitals (tables XI to XIII)
First Admissions (tables XIV to XXIV)
Readmissions (tables XXV to XXVII)
Total Admissions by Counties (table XXVIII)
Deaths and Discharges (tables XXIX to XXXIX)
Patients Paroled (table XL)

18
21
25
26
29
31
36
53
58
61
79

II - HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS
Resident Population 1915-1935 (table I)
Total Admissions to Schools 1915-1935 (table II)
Total Deaths 1915-1935 (table III)
Population and Capacities Compared 1915-1935 (table IV)
Charts of Population and Capacities
Movement of School Population (table V)
School Population by Age Groups, Mental Status, etc. (tables VI
to IX)
Admissions by Age Groups, Mental Status, etc. (table X and XI)
Discharges and Deaths Analyzed (tables XII to XV)

2
3
4
7
8
11
12
21
24

III - STATE EPILEPTIC COLONY
Resident Population 1915-1935 (table I)
Construction and Capacities 1915-1935 (table II)
Admissions and Deaths 1915-1935 (table III)
Movement of Population (table IV)
Resident Population (table V)
Admissions Analyzed (tables V to VII)
Discharges and Deaths Analyzed (tables VIII to X)

32
33
35
36
38
38
43

S T A T E

H O S P I T A L

C O M M I S S I O

Mr. W. P. Gallagher, Chairman

Owosso

Dr. E. P. Wilbur, Secretary

Kalamazoo

Mrs. Ida D. Ayres

Grosse Points

Dr. Prank P. Bohn

Newberry

Mr. James P. Milliken

Traverse City

Mr. Fred C. Striffler

Oaro

Mr. E. P. White

Lapeer

M I C H I G A N

S T A T E

H O S P I T A L S

The various institutions or mental hospitals under the State
Hospital Commission, which are included in the following tabulations
and within the scope of this report, may be separately grouped and
individually noted as follows:
The care and treatment of civil insane is provided in the state
hospitals at Kalamazoo, Pontiac, Traverse City, Newberry, and Ypsilanti.
In addition to these institutions, Wayne County provides similar care
in the hospital at Eloise and all patients remaining there continuously
in excess of one year, become state patients and are treated there at
state expense. The Psychopathic Hospital at Ann Arbor admits patients
committed for observation, as well as temporary commitments aid some
by voluntary admission. The proportion of these not actually discharged
after a limited period of stay at this hospital, are definitely committed and transferred to one of the state hospitals for more permanent
care and treatment. The record of admissions and discharges at the
Psychopathic Hospital are included for convenience with those for the
regular state hospitals, although the former institution is administered
by the regents of the University of Michigan instead of the State Hospital Commission. It is noted that the conditions of entrance and discharge of patients, together with the resulting high turn-over at Psychopathic Hospital, present a situation distinctly different from the
remaining institutions considered in this report, and proper allowance
will be made in making comparisons.
The state hospital at Ionia is for the dangerous and criminal insane, with its population containing a large proportion of male patients
and being more definitely fixed than is the case with the civil insane.
Care and treatment is provided by the state for mental defectives
in the Home and Training School, located at Lapeer. The Home and Training School for Wayne County is located at Northville, having been opened in 1927.
The population of this latter institution is included in
this report. Those inmates at the Northville school without reimbursement, who have remained there over a year, become state wards and their
maintenance is paid Tor by the state.
The Farm Colony, located at Wahjamega, provides care and treatment
for epileptics. Details covering the population of this institution
are contained in a later portion of this report.
The first series of tables in this report Indicate the growth of
population with admissions and discharges over a twenty year period
from 1915 to-date. The remaining tables include analytical studies of
psychoses of patients with relation to their age, sex, nativity, etc.,
as given in the series of years from 1931 to 1934 inclusive.

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

DEPORTATION AND REPATRIATION OP PATIENTS
The State Welfare Department, working in conjunction with the
U. S. Immigration Service, as well as other states, has brought about
the deportation of some patients and repatriation of others, amounting
to a total of 92 for the twelve month period ending November 1, 1935.
Sixty-six of these were deported and four repatriated to their
native country, while twenty-two were transferred to other states in
which they had legal residence. The following list Indicates the institutions from which these patients were removed:
State
Deported
Repatriated
Transfer
Kalamazoo Hospital
2
2
2
Pontiac Hospital
2
Newberry Hospital
1
2
Traverse City Hospital
2
Ionia Hospital
31
Ypsllanti Hospital
12
12
Eloise (Wayne County)
18
Michigan Home and Training School
2
4
Totals
66
4
22
OUT PATIENT CLINICS
Members of the staffs of the different state hospitals have been
conducting mental hygiene clinics in different cities throughout the
state for some time past. These clinics are for the purpose of seeing
community cases, both children and adults, as well as paroled and discharged cases from the individual hospitals. This out-patient service
was started in the City of Kalamazoo in 1916 by members of the staff
from Kalamazoo State Hospital.
During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1935, there were held 456
of these clinics in thirty-one different cities and communities throughout the state in which a total of 5280 cases were examined, of which
3406 were new cases and 1874 were either paroled or discharged patients
from the hospitals, or cases previously examined at former clinics.
Number of Cases
Return
Total
Kalamazoo
48
7
80
438
Pontiac
42
4
107
409
Traverse City
73
11
419
1154
Newberry
6
28
43
155
Ionia
1
0
35
Not regular
Ypsilanti
1
12
387
417
1
Psychopathic
253
1834
858
2672
31
456
3406
1874
5280
Of the total new cases examined 41/6 were under 18 years of age. The
largest group of all new cases, 1461, was referred from the University
Hospital. 555 were from courts and 534 from public welfare and health
agencies.
Recommendations for these new cases included 735 for commitment to
a state institution and special care and definite treatment for 1575
others.
Number of
clinics

Number of
cities

New
358
302
735
112
35
30

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

1 - INSTITUTION INVENTORIES AND PROPERTIES

This table gives a general statement of the Institutions
under the direction of the State Hospital Commission as of June 30,
1935, or at the close of the fiscal year.
In separate columns are shown in each case the investments
in real estate and buildings as a total, and also the total for personal property items, including stock, machinery, equipment, furnishings, and supplies. The values, as given for real estate and buildings, are derived largely from the original investment figures, and
are not comparable as they do not indicate present replacement values.
As to personal property totals the Inventory values as given
conform more closely to present values, as these items are naturally
being replaced at more frequent intervals.
In the case of the Mt. Pleasant branch of the Lapeer Home
and Training School, which property was recently acquired from the
United States Department of Interior, the figures given are for the
value of all usable properties in the original inventory by the
Federal government.

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MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

II a - b - o - INSTITUTION EXPENDITURES

These three tables Indicate the yearly expenditure for each
of the three groups of institutions over the 21 year period from
1915 to 1955, as shown by the annual reports of the Auditor General,
covering all vouchers paid during each fiscal year. These expenditures, as well as receipt shown later, are all of necessity based on
the fiscal year ending June 30th.
Table Ila covers these expenditures for the seven mental
hospitals noted in detail In Table I. The column for Operation and
Maintenance includes personal service, supplies and contractual service, as well as maintenance of buildings and equipment. Also included are the amounts paid annually to Wayne County for maintenance
of state patients at Eloise Hospital, a Wayne County Institution.
In the last column is indicated the proportional annual expenditure
for institution operation and maintenance for each resident patient,
based on the institution populations of June 30th of each year.
Under additions and improvements are shown amounts spent annually for added capital outlay, Including new buildings and equipment. The large expenditures shown from 1930 to 1933 cover erection
of the Ypsilanti Hospital and additions to Ionia, Traverse City,
and Newberry Hospitals.
Tables lib and lie similarly cover amounts expended over the
21 year period by the Home and Training Schools and the Epileptic
Colony. In table lib are included costs for maintaining each year
the total number of state patients at the training school built by
Wayne County at Northvllle and first occupied In 1926.
Increased expenditures for Additions and Improvements are
shown from 1922 to 1925 and in 1930 and 1931, when additional cottages
and colony buildings were erected at the Home and Training School at
Lapeer.
In table lie it will be noted that up to 1920 and In 1932 a
large portion of the total expenditure was required for erecting additional buildings at the Colony. This institution was first opened
in 1914.

11

Table Ha
Year Ending
June 30

- MENTAL HOSPITAL GROUP-ANNUAL EXPENDITURES OVER 20 YEAR PERIOD 1915-1935

Total Expenditures

Operation & Maintenance

Addition & Improvement

Annual Maintenance
Expense for resident
patient
$194.00
204.00
219.00
266.00

1915
1916
1917
1918

$1,609,108.73
1,797,085.33
1,792,981.78
2,293,011.48

f1,457,030.38
1,553,620.40
1,698,632.84
2,089,536.86

$152,078.35
243,464.93
94,618.94
203,474.62

1919
1920
1921
1922

2,470,954.44
2,908,620.28
3,539,329.46
2,664,680.60

2,379,204.13
2,742,648.48
3,389,610.20
2,606,093.71

91,550.13
165,971.80
160,947.25
58,586.89

301.00
343.00
412.00
307.00

1923
1924
1925
1926

2,932,800.49
2,988,839.40
3,406,519.30
3,631,070.55

2,896,642.36
2,798,655.78
3,048,197.96
3,179,582.51

36,158.13
190,173.62
358,321.42
451,488.04

347.00
315.00
397.00
343.00

1927
1928
1929
1930

3,764,425.13
3,536,266.42
3,743,435.63
4,169,1^6.98

3>507>798.42
3,385,368.98
3,696,680.55
3,529,069.53

256,626.71
150>897.44
46,755.08
640,077.45

363.00
339.00
363.00
331.00

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

7,194,667.06
4,555,525.22
3,527,398.33
3,368,958.74
3,756,421.86

3,433,883,49
3,311i467.96
2,996,582,70
3>204,095i24
3,668,225.59

3>760,783.57
1,244>057.26
530,815.63
164>863.50
88,196.27

303.00
269.00
231.00
244.00
270.00

Q

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tx
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t>

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QQ

Table lib - EOME AND TRAININGS SCHOOLS-ANNUAL EXPENDITURES OVER 20 YEAR PERIOD
Total Expenditures

Operation and Maintenance

Addition & Improvements

Annual Maintenance
Per Patient

1915
1916
1917
1918

$306,708.?!
301,586.20
312,634.99
446,692.87

,986.52
231,439.82
279,993.14
383,681.06

$75,721.79
70,146.38
32,641.85
63,011.91

$197.00
181.00
192.00
247.00

1919
1920
1921
1922

463,343.24
502,841.32
620,858.11
731,360.41

406.253.68
489,515.20
601,464.58
508,514.93

57,089.56
13,326.12
19,293.53
222,845.40

257.00
299.00
358,00
302.00

1923
1924
1925
1926

886,838.08
801,504.39
999,625.96
726,215.54

635,523.38
591,281.94
664.018.18
724,474.39

251,314.70
210,222.45
315,607.78
3,741.15

277.00
251.00
268.00
261.00

1927
1928
1929
1930

777,117.87
863,755.83
1,055,123.15
1,381,348.60

771,691.11
868,818.16
1,013,059.75
975,834.87

5,426.76
937.67
42,063.40
405,513.73

274.00
277.00
300.00
291.00

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

1,545,423.70
1,113,642.32
965,608.68
890,508.47
1,171,970.40

947,646.55
991,025.89
909,498.99
886,145.83
1,117,755,87

597,777.14
122,616.43
56., 109.69
4,362.64
54,214.53

246.00
25S.OO
225.00
218.00
257.00

Q

W
O
33

Table lie - EPILEPTIC COLONY - ANNUAL EXPENDITURES OVER 20 YEAR PERIOD 1915-1935

Year

Total Expenditures

1915
1916
1917
1918

$ 170,467.17
171,930.92
212,544.21
254,945.12

$ 48,450.12
80,982.74
117,467.46
138,179.32

1919
1920
1921
1922

269,471.69
273,747.73
258,246.33
188,494.84

167,038.13
171,747.96
818,865.44
166,131.28

102,433.56
101,999.77
39,380.89
22,363.56

331.00
350.00
399.00
295.00

1923
1924
1925
1926

201,125.05
239,944.95
354,675.19
280,578.87

197,002.17
200,103.54
209,950.74
202,340.58

4,122.88
39,841.41
144,724.45
78,238.29

297.00
283.00
291.00
240,00

1927
1928
1929
1930

260,341.94
230,511.32
248,798.44
230,079.29

250,500.89
227,603.27
247,332.43
225,136.26

9,832.05
2,908.05
1,466.01
4,943.03

295.00
278.00
318.00
288.00

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

227,909.14
483,828.30
305,099.07
218,715.53
203,473.17

226,575.46
222,352.56
238,894.96
213,579.01
196,583.91

1,333.68
261,475.74
66,204.11
5,136.52
6,889.26

280.00
271.00
256.00
218.00
198.00

Operation and
maintenance

Addition and
improvements
| 1-22,017.05
90,948.18
95,076.75
116,765.80

Annual Maintenance
per patient
$ 314.00
468.00
338.00
377.00

o
H
i—i
O

69
O
00

REIMBURSEMENTS BY PATIENT GUARDIANS AND ESTATES FOR MAINTENANCE
The amounts which have been received annually for the past 21 years from the above sources for the
maintenance of patients in these institutions are noted in this table.
In 1920 the change which centralized accounts at Lansing, provided better records and means of collecting these amounts as evidenced by the increased totals from that date. The large total for Epileptic
Colony given in 1923, results from an accumulation of amounts collected that year which were due from previous years.
These figures are taken from the annual reports of the Auditor General which are based on the fiscal
year ending June 30th.
Table III - RECEIPTS PROM INDIVIDUALS AND ESTATES
Year Ending June 50
1915
1916
1917
1918

Total Receipts
$ 34754.20
35640.99
32579.71
54497.97

Mental Hospitals
$ 26,551.67
31,365.08
30,742.27
47,081.13

Home & Training Schools
$ 8,202.53
4,043.30
1,555.04
5,341.60

Epileptic Farm Colony
$
232.61
282.40
2075.24

Q
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33

1919
1920
1921
1922

67836.66
210615.19
277395.64
273541.84

61,938.19
200,723.62
265,384.00
255,117.97

4,465.73
8,077.44
9,068.61
10,079.38

1432.74
1814.13
2943.03
8344.49

1923
1924
1925
1926

280832.87
281922.88
282120.06
275565.03

258,748.44
266,183.27
262,539.31
251,223.98

10,013.64
10,502.92
12,663.56
14,309.67

12070.79
5236.69
6917.19
8031.38

1927
1928
1929
1930

273924.10
267315.95
280335.64
299487.98

253,686.91
247,697.63
258,750.21
276,104.36

13,714.00
13,591.88
14,828.55
15,818.48

6523.19
6026.44
6756.88
7565.15

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

251386.89
242893.52
205951.06
174510.91
206091.50

227,802.05
221,610.86
187,119.65
160,326.18
192,362.56

15,278.02
15,367.21
13,074.86
11,665.93
10,668.35

8306.82
5915.45
5756.55
2518.80
3060.59

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16

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

IV- EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL TEAR 1934 - 1935

The detail of the year's expenditures by individual institutions is given in this table. The additional expense of having
Wayne County maintain state mental patients at Eloise and mental defectives at Northville is shown in amounts under separate items.
The total expenditure by the state for all patients in mental
hospitals for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1935 was $3,756,421.86,
and for those in schools for mental defectives during the same period
was $1,171,970.40.
In the last column are shown the average amounts expended by
each institution for the maintenance of each patient during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1935. These figures are based on the average residence population for the year and the total operating expense, not including capital outlay for additions and improvements.

V

- POPULATION OF MENTAL HOSPITALS

This table gives the total number of patients being cared for
in mental hospitals in the state for the past twenty years, but does
not include those on parole. In addition to the patients in the
seven mental hospitals noted in Table IV, all patients in Wayne
County Hospital at Eloise are included. Those being cared for as
mental defectives and epileptics are in separate institutions and
are covered in detail in a later portion of this report.
Populations given are as taken June 30th of each year from
institution records from 1915 to 1935. An increase of QZ% in total
population has occurred during the period with the ratio of males
to females remaining about the same. The ratio of patients to each
100,000 of the state's concurrent population as shown by the last
three columns indicates a marked increase of patients to state population since 1932 due to additional space being provided in the new
Ypsilanti State Hospital, as well as to more overcrowding.
Figures
giving the population of the entire state as of July 1st of each year,
from which totals in the last three columns were computed, were obtained from the division of Vital Statistics in the State Department
of Health.

17

Table V - TOTAL PATIENTS IN STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS 1915 - 1935

No. of Resident Patients

Population of Michigan

On
June 30

Female

Total

Number of Patients Each
100,000 State Population
Male
Female
Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

1915
1916
1917
1918

4078
4157
4206
4237

3370
3461
3532
3612

7448
7618
7739
7849

1694450
1744850
1785300
1829560

1544843
1580266
1625640
1667204

3339293
3325116
3410940
3496764

239.2
237.7
234.8
230.9

219.7
219.4
218.2
217.9

239.6
228.9
226.8
224.7

1919
1920
1921
1922

4274
4335
4468
4636

3611
3655
3756
3846

7885
7990
8224
8482

1879240
1928436
1990600
2059500

1703348
1739976
1795199
1844286

3582588
3668412
3785790
3903186

227.9
224.8
223.4
229,1

211.0
210.1
208.0
206.0

220.0
217.8
216.1
218.0

1923
1924
1925
1926

4710
4908
4939
5057

3877
3980
4075
4201

8587
8888
9014
9258

2118600
2175200
2241550
2309600

1901973
1962760
2013797
2063134

4020573
4137960
4255347
4372734

231.1
229.6
221.0
216.9

210.5
205.9
201.5
199.0

221.3
218.4
211.7
208.4

1927
1928
1929
1930

5274
5464
5685
5873

4340
4521
4680
4799

9614
9985
10365
10672

2361804
2428157
2494745
2519309

2128317
2179351
2230150
2323016

4490121
4607508
4724895
4842325

223.2
225.1
227,6
233.1

203.8
207.4
209.8
206.5

214.1
214.7
219.3
223.9

1931
1932
1933

1934

6208
6776
7167
7284

5102
5517
5780
5848

11310
12293
12947
13132

2608499
2713394
2667747
2694197

2322501
2415516
2375253
2398803

4931000
5128910
5043000
5093000

238.2
248.9
269.1
270.2

219.6
228.3
243.3
243.7

229.3
239.6
256.7
257.8

1935

7542

6035

13578

2717480

2420520

5138000

277.5

247.6

265.1

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HOSPITAL ADMISSIONS
Total admissions, including firat and readmlssions but excluding transfers, to mental hospitals in
the state are shown for each calendar year from 1915 to and Including 1934.
These admissions cover those
at all seven mental hospitals, including State Psychopathic and Ionia, as well as the number admitted by
Wayne County at Elolse. In proportion to the state population, this table shows in column three a marked
decrease in the last two years in the total admission rate, compared to that being obtained In 1915 and
the years immediately following. The opening of the new state hospital at Ypsilantl in 1931 provided the
increase In admissions shown in 1931 and 1932.
Table VI - TOTAL ADMISSIONS - FIRST ADMISSIONS 20 YEAR PERIOD
Calendar
Year

Total
Admissions

Per 100,000
Population

1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

22Y9
2308
2173
2189
2332

70.5
69.4
63.6
62.9
65.1

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924

2276
2342
2554
2419
2447

62.0
61.5
65.6
62.3
60.1

2002
1976

51.5
48.5

1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

2463
2605
2543
2581
2510

57.9
59.5
56.8
56.9
53.2

2237
2225
2124
2143
2114

52.5
50.8
47.3
46.5
44.7

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934

2259
2964
3154
2655
2457

46.7
59.8
61.4
52.5
48.4

1811
2524
2686
2254
2110

37.4
51.1
52.1
44.7
41.7

Total First
Admissions

Admissions
Per 100,000
Population

GO
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53

Table VII - DEATHS IN HOSPITALS

The total number of deaths occurring each year among the total patients residing at the eight mental
hospitals, Including the Wayne County Hospital at Elolse, are here shown for each calendar year from 1923 to
1934 inclusive.
In the second column is given the total number of patients under treatment each year in these eight
hospitals, obtained by adding the total admissions during each year to the total number of patients in residence at the beginning of the year.
The death rate per thousand thus under treatment is calculated for each year and shown in the last
column, clearly indicating a definite decrease in the last ten years in this rate of hospital deaths.
In 1932 there was recorded the highest total of deaths in a decade, but the resulting proportionate
rate is much lower than that of eight or nine years before.
TOTAL DEATHS IN HOSPITALS WITH DEATH RITE PER 1000 UNDER TREATMENT

8
Calendar Year

Deaths Per
1000 under
Treatment

Total Deaths

Total Tinder
Treatment

1923
1924
1925
1926

819
835
832
865

10954
11185
11414
11741

75.6
74.7
72.8
73.6

1927
1928
1929
1930

875
809
891
798

11979
12381
12685
12777

73.0
65.3
70.2
62.6

1931
1932
1933
1934

757
933
824
846

13767
14934
15406
15753

55.0
62.5
53.4
53.6

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'

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

VIII - HOSPITAL POPULATIONS AND CAPACITIES
The annual percentages of increase in both hospital population
of mental patients and capacities of state mental hospitals since the
year 1915 are herein noted. By June 30, 1935 the total population of
mental patients being cared for in the state was increased 82.3 per
cent over that of 1915, while on the same date the combined capacity
of all state mental hospitals shows an increase of but 4:2.2 per cent
over that of the same date in 1915.
The resultant overcrowding is indicated in the sixth column,
giving percentage of population in excess of capacity, as it would be
were the state institutions caring for all state patients. In figuring this item, there are added to the patients in state institutions
the state patients being maintained by Wayne County.
In^the seventh and eighth columns are shown the additional capacities available in the Wayne County Hospital at Elolse, and the
resultant actual lower per cent of overcrowding in state hospitals
due to this aid being given the state by Wayne County authorities.
HEW CONSTRUCTION
The building activities, which have been carried on since 1915,
to enlarge the capacity of the state for providing more adequate care
of the insane, have resulted in an increased capacity of 2631 beds
during that period. Included in this construction were permanent alterations to older buildings, as well as new dormitories, cottages
and hospitals at the several institutions; also the initial erection
and opening of the group of hospital buildings for the new institution!
at Ypsllanti. These additions are described herein in detail as to
buildings and location and the chronological order of their erection.
The amount of capital outlay involved in this construction is given
in Table Il-a of this report in the column covering Additions and Improvements*
In the year 1915 there were added 135 beds to the capacity of
the state hospitals for mental disease. 100 of these were at Pontiac
with the opening of the new woman's infirmary and 35 at Newberry with
a 20 bed addition to Cottage 0 and 15 beds more for the tubercular
ward.
In 1916 at Newberry, Cottage H was opened in October with 50
bed capacity and during this same year Ionia Hospital increased their
capacity by 45 beds.
At Kalamazoo Hospital the opening of Noble Lodge for employes
In November, 1917 provided dormitory space for 60 more patients.
There were no additions during 1918 and early in the year 1919
Cottage I at Newberry was opened with a capacity of 50 beds. This
same year at Pontiac one floor of the Sawyer Cottage for men was completed with a capacity of 50 beds.

22

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

New Construction: continued.
During the year 1920 Ionia Hospital completed an addition which
provided 45 more beds at that institution.
For the next three years there was no additional bed capacity
provided at any of the hospitals, while changes involving Ionia Hospital in relation to Ionia Reformatory during 1922 resulted in a reduction of 116 beds for the former institution.
In 1924 the second floor of Sawyer Cottage at Pontiac provided
50 more beds on completion and Ionia Hospital opened new dormitories
having capacity of 100 beds.
No additions occurred during 1925 and in 1926 Ionia completed
changes in the location of their occupational therapy department which
made possible dormitory space for SO more patients.
During the next four years there was no construction which provided any added capacity of. consequence. New dining rooms at Traverse
City in 1928 and resulting changes in a number of cottages there provided additional dormitory space for not over six patients.
In 1931 a total of 1431 beds were added to the state'mental
hospital capacity. In January of that year Pratt Cottage was opened
at Kalamazoo with 60 added beds and the opening of the new nurses
home there at the same time provided dormitory space in various wards
for 100 more patients. In May, Traverse City opened a new tubercular
cottage and a new infirmary with a total capacity of 440 beds. This
total addition was subsequently reduced by the remodeling of hall 7
for employees quarters, making the net addition of beds 404.
In midsummer the official opening of the new hospital at Ypsilanti took
place, adding 867 beds to the total capacity that year.
During 1932 the new receiving hospital at Ionia was opened with
a capacity of 204 patients. At Ypsilanti this year the completion of
new dormitories took place which added their rated capacity of 450
beds. However, because of that Institution being as yet incomplete
as a unit and the need of added day room space for hospital patients,
this capacity is reduced to 381, making the total for that year 585
additional beds.
In 1933 the Ferguson receiving hospital at Newberry was opened
and added 120 beds to the total. This makes up the last building construction providing new bed capacity up to the close of the fiscal
year, June 30, 1935.
IX - HOSPITAL CAPACITIES AND OVERCROWDINQ
The normal capacities of each of the seven state mental hospitals is here given, together with the actual overcrowding, based on
the resident populations of each on June 30, 1935.
The determination of these hospital capacities is not based on
any unalterably fixed standard but results from an effort to obtain

23

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

Hospital Capacities and Overcrowding: continued.
comparative figures as to actual overcrowding in these state institutions. A normal capacity rating has been used, requiring as a general
average at least 60 square feet of surface for individual bed space,
and at the same time taking into account such factors as type and
condition of patient, additional day space needed, single rooms in use,
windows available, and similar conditions of practical importance.
The hospital for criminal insane at Ionia requiring a higher proportion of single rooms to dormitories, is accordingly based on a higher
rating for individual bed space, viz., 70 square feet. The capacities
given in the table for all hospitals allow a total combined area per
patient for bed and day space of from 95 to 100 square feet.
The Wayne County Hospital at Eloise is also shown with their
resident population, thus giving the total population of all mental
hospitals covered in this report as of the above date.
Had the 2488 state patients, being cared for on June 30, 1935
at Eloise Hospital, been of necessity transferred to v state hospitals,
the rate of overcrowding in these state institutions would have shown
a total increase of 28.0 per cent.

Table IX - POPULATION, CAPACITIES AND OVERCROWDING
June 30, 1935

Patients

Capacities

Capacity

Kalamazoo

2742

2207

535

24,2

Pontiac

1761

1524

237

15.5

Traverse City

2286

1910

376

19.5

Hewberry

1233

1105

128

11.5

861

831

20

2.4

1248

234

18.7

1530

17.2

Mental Hospitals

Ionia
Tpsilanti

1482

58

60

10413
Eloise (Wayne County)
3164

8885

Aggregate Total

8885

Psychopathic

Capacity

Total State Hospitals

13577

2488*

# State Patients

24

4018

, 45.2

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

FUTURE HOSPITAL REQUIREMENTS

The total number of mental patients who were being provided
treatment in state hospitals far the insane and also in Eloise Hospital
in Wayne County, amounted to a total of 13,578 on December 31, 1934,
there being that number in residence on that date. On the same date
there were approximately 1200 committed persons on the waiting lists
of the above hospitals, as well as an unknown number in infirmaries
and homes, and had it been possible to provide needed hospital care
for them, the total number of hospitalized patients per 100,000 population would then have been nearly 290 as a result.
Assuming that a rate of 300 patients per each 100,000 of the
state's population would provide sufficiently to meet present mental
hospital needs, the conditions as to hospital population and admissions
would be about as listed below, if this increase were provided over a
five year period or by the end of ,the year 1939.

Year

State
Population

Hospital Population Rate
Total
Population
Per 100,000
Admissions

Admission
Rate
Per 100,000

1935

5,138,000

13,600

265

2,375

46.3

1936

5,294,500

14,290

270

2,742

51.8

1937

5,389,000

15,180

280

3,107

57.7

1938

5,483,500

15,875

290

3,430

62.6

1939

5,578,000

16,720

300

3,520

63.2

The state's population as listed is in agreement with the rate
of increase over the last ten years. The hospital populations are
shown as increasing gradually over the five year period. The total admissions given are based on the experience noted in population movement over the last four years and allow for replacing patients who die
and are discharged during the period, as well as additional patients
made possible by added capacity as it would be supplied.
If this schedule were carried out, the rate of admissions per
100,000 population would, at the highest point indicated, be much lower
than the corresponding rate in 1915 as shown in table VI.
The number of additional beds required to bring about this increase would be about 3000, provided no effort were made to reduce the
present overcrowding in the different hospitals.
With this increase in beds brought up to 3,500 the present overcrowding could be reduced by fifty per cent with the assumption that
Wayne County would continue to provide for the same number of state
patients as at present.

25

M I C H I G A N STATE HOSPITALS

7"A T if. NTS

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MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

X - MOVEMENT OF POPULATION

The movement of the patient population of the seven state
mental hospitals and of Wayne County hospital at Eloise for the two
year period from January 1, 1933 to December 31, 1934 is given in
detail "by institutions in this table.
The changes include admissions, discharges, transfers, and
deaths as indicated by detailed reports from the different institutions during the period noted.
These figures are of necessity on a calendar year basis and
are not comparable with previous tables on capacities and population
which are made up to conform with the fiscal year ending June 30th.

CHARTS ON POPULATION AND CAPACITIES

On page twenty-six the population and capacities of the
public hospitals of the state are shown graphically as they have increased each year from 1915 to date. The resident population of the
Wayne County Hospital at Eloise is included in the total for all
hospitals indicated by the dotted line. The population of the
Hospital for Criminal Insane at Ionia is included with the State
Hospitals. The capacities, expressed in beds as a unit, are determined as explained under Table IX and the difference between the
capacity line and the population line for state hospitals indicates
the amount of overcrowding in the state hospitals over this period
of years.
The chart on page twenty-seven graphically shows the relative
increases by years in state population, hospital population and
hospital capacities as expressed in percentages of the amounts
occurring in 1915. The figures for state population each year are
based on the figures furnished by the State Department of Health.
These graphs indicate that the state hospital population increase
exceeded the increase in state population from the year 1931 and
after.

28

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

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MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

XI -

PATIENT POPULATION BY PSYCHOSES

The total resident population on December 31, 1954 in the eight
mental hospitals, as indicated in Table X, is here divided according
to psychoses with the resulting percentages in each case.
Of the total population 45.9 per cent have been diagnosed as
dementia praecox, while 10.8 per cent are listed as manic depressive.
The differences between the sexes in the various types of psychoses
are shown in the last two columns.
Males are shown to predominate with regard to general paralysis
and alcoholic psychoses, while females are in greater proportion in
cases of senility, manic depressive, and involution melancholia.
These figures apply only to patients living in the hospitals
as of the date given, while those on parole are similarly shown in
Table XL of this report.

XII - PATIENT POPULATION BY COUNTRIES

The total resident population of December 31, 1934 is again
divided in this table according to the country of birth or parentage
for each patient. All native born, both of whose parents are native
born, are shown under the United States. All native or foreign born,
having both parents born in another country, are listed under the head
of that country. With parents born in different countries, that of
the father is the one under which the patient is listed. The number
of people in the state's population by the 1930 U.S. census divided
by countries and determined on the basis already described, is shown
in the fourth column. The proportionate number of resident patients
connected with each country, as related to each 100,000 persons of
that country in the whole state population, is shown in the last
column. Austria, with 308 patients listed, shows the highest proportionate number of any country. Italy, while having nearly three
times the number of persons listed in the state's population, has 51
less patients in state hospitals than has Austria.
The possibility of making these comparisons with the state
population as of a 1934 census, instead of the 1930 basis, would obviously have a material effect on the total ratio, as well as on the
ratio between individual countries, were such a compilation available.

Table XI - TOTAL INSTITUTION POPULATION DEC. 31, 1934 IN RELATION WITH TYPES OF PSYCHOSES

Total No. of Patients
'

Trainnatic
Senile
Cerebral Arterioscleroses
General Paralysis
Cerebral Syphilis

21
173
289
706
140

Huntington ' s Chorea
With Brain Tumor
Other Nervous Diseases
Alcoholic
Drugs and Toxins

18
2
153

14

270
162
216
81

35
443
451
922
221

.3
2.3
3.9
9.4
1.9

.2
4.5
2.7
3.6
1.3

.3
3.3
3.3
6.8
1.6

34
5

.2

.3

.2

233

2.0
4.7
.1

1.3
.6
.1

1.7

1.0
14.9
1.0
47.7

355
10

16
3
80
37
7

Other Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive
Involution Melancholia
Dementia Praeeox
Paranoia & Paranoid condition

47
530
44
3336
355

60
902
59
2895
432

With Epilepsy
Psychoneuroses
With Psychopathic Personality
With Mental Deficiency
Undiagnosed Psychoses
Without Psychoses

135
102

214

137
315
174
461

79
121
65
216
114
246

7fiOS

RO7R

1357R

Tn-hol

-_

Psychoses Percentages
of total population

392
17
107

.6

1432

7.1

103

.6
44.4
4.7

6231

787
223
202
531
288

707

1.8
1.4

1.8
4.2
2.3
6.1

7.1
1.3
2.0
1.1
3.6

1.9
4.1

2.9
.1

.8
10.5
.8
45.9
5.8
1.6
1.6

1.5
3.9
2.1
5.2

Distribution by Sexes
in percentages

60.0
39.1
64.1
76.6
63.4

40.0
60.9
35.9
23.4
36.6

53.0
40.0
65.7
90.. 6
58.8

47.0
60.0
34.3
9.4
41.2

44.0
37.0
42.7
53.5
45.2

56.0
63.0
57.2
46.5
54.8

63.2
45.7
67.8
59.3
60.4
65.2

36.8
54.3
32.2
40.7
39.6
34.8

55.3

44.7

Ul

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00

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS
Table XII - TOTAL RESIDENT POPULATION DEC. 31, 1934
BY COUNTRIES OF BIRTH OR EXTRACTION

Population of
State by
Countries

Patients per
100,000
Population

34972
26818
499002

882.0
222.0
307.0

44602

198.0

50507
165848
74299
18085

325.0
255.0
510.0
399.0

365263
16175
106426

429.0
369.0
235.0

40434

524.0

83702
98048

555.0
262.0

33492

236.0

23117
320534

339.0
317.0

35
345
144
4*
7
283

20381
75656
65990

175.0
455.0
218.0

2149

53
82
18
11
7*
56
1*
2*
1*
4363
81
1195
3*

11066
23196
6024
2273

350.0
410.0
482.0
356.0
299.0
485.0

70489

273.0

2556192
19258

171.0
422.0

4842325

280.2

Total
Africa
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Canada
China
Czechoslavakia
Cuba
Denmark
England
Finland
France

M

F

3
1

2

214
34
812

5
49
1
37
219
212
43

Germany
Greece
Holland
Hungary
India
Ireland
Italy
Japan
Jugo Slav! a
Mexico
Norway
Poland

819
48
156

Roumania
Rus sis.
Scotland
South America
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
Wales
Bulgaria
Albania
Lithuania
Esthonia
Latvia
Luxemburg
United States
Other Countries
Unknown
Phillipine Islands
Porta Rico
West Indies
Totals

21
219
72
3
6
150
24
52
9
9
7
39
1
2

114
1
242
177
1
43
9
38
626

94
26

T

3*
308
60

718 1530
1
6*
40
89
1#
28
204

65
423

165
29

377
72

747 1566
11
59
93
249
209
95
4*
3
466
224
80
257
1*

35
78
4
13*
40
78
393 1019
14
126
72
1
1
133
29
30
9
2

17

1

2310 2053
62
19
647
548
3
2
8*
4*
4
7503 6075 13578

^Included with total of "Other Countries."

68577

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

XIII - PATIENT POPULATION BY ABES

The total population listed on the books of the eight institutions,
which includes those on parole 'in addition to those in residence, is
here divided according to the various ages of patients on December 31,
1934.
Of the entire population 22.8 per cent are shown to be 60 years
of age and over.
Kalamazoo Hospital has the highest proportion of older patients
with 31 per cent 60 years and over. Up to 60 years of age, males comprise 56 per cent of the population, but over 60 years females are in
the majority.
The average present age for the entire group of patients shown on
the books on the above date amounts to 47.9 years.
XIV - ANALYSIS OF FIRST ADMISSIONS

In this table are shown the total first admissions for the four
year period of 1931 to 1934 inclusive, arranged by institutions in relation with the different types of psychosis. Of this total 4,385 or
almost fifty per cent were received at Eloise Hospital and Ypsilanti
State Hospital. The predominance of males admitted at Newberry and
Traverse City, as compared with Pontiac and Psychopathic, is noted. The
high proportion of males admitted at Ionia is due to the criminal status
of all patients under care of that institution.
The greater portion of these admissions occured in 1931 and 1932
with the completion of new hospital units. The highest number was in
1932 when 2,685 patients were admitted for the first time.
XV - PSYCHOSIS PERCENTAGES OF FIRST ADMISSIONS

In this table all first admissions during the four year period
of 1931-1934 are included in the calculations to determine the relative
frequency of the various types of psychosis in the state as a whole.
The types of psychosis are listed in the order of their frequency, the
first four types including over half the total admissions. Under "all
others" are grouped four remaining types of psychoses having a relatively small number of cases. Here are also included separate columns showing the percentage relation of types of psychosis to total admissions
to each of the different institutions during the above period. Considerable variation may be noted as between institutions in the case of
certain types of psychosis.

33

Table XIII - AGES OF PATIENTS ON BOOKS DECEMBER 31, 1934
Total

Eloise
Ionia
Kalamazoo

Under 15

M

P

T

1805

1506

3311

767

85

852

1537

1511

3048

772

602

1006

15 - 19

20 - 24

25 - 29

30 - 34

35 - 39

M

P

M

P

H

P

M

P

M

P

H

P

80

2

25

26

92

61

140

116

189

147

225

237

26

1

75

8

103

6

112

10

5
19

8

54

36

77

77

116

78

120

120

1374

10

6

19

25

53

33

49

55

59

41

880

1886

2

6

20

16

48

29

80

64

86

90

57

62

119

2

8

11

5

11

16

2

6

5

4

1402

1226

2628

3

11

13

70

36

82

59

89

65

107

106

Ypsilanti

930

921

1851

4

27

18

54

53

34

68

91

91

108

137

Total

8276

6793 15069

27

101

85

346

233

570

406

719

512

822

745

100 .

100.

1.2

1.2

4.2

3.4

6.8

5.9

7.5

9.8

11.0

Newberry
Pontiao
Psychopathic
Traverse City

Percentages
of groups

100.

1

2

0.3

1

0.1

8.7

to
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Table XIV

-

PSYCHOSES OF FIRST ADMISSIONS 1931-1934 INCLUSIVE

State Totals

Elolse

M

F

T

M

24
Traumatic
300
Senile
Cerebral Arterioscleroses
590
819
Oeneral Paralysis
124
Cerebral Syphilis
16
Huntington's Chorea
4
Brain Tumor
Other Nervous Disease 167
331
Alcoholic
16
Drugs and Toxins
Other Somatic Disease: 96
Manic Depressive
436
Involution Melancholli i 18
1196
Dementia Praecox
Paranoia and Paranoid
161
Condition
101
Epileptic
Psychoneuroses
177
Psychopathic Personality
122
Mental Deficiency
160
Dndiagnosed Psychoses 205
576
Without Psychoses

6
320

620

Psychoses

Total

30

280 870
232 1051
45 169
10 26
3
7
99 266
42 373
32 48
125 221
639 1075
72 90
918 2114
146 307
57 158
288 465
42
109
179
290

164
269
384
866

Ionia

F

H

1
4
137 164

6
13
20

20

335
55
7
2
42
153

24
96
25
5

9
1

F

1

Newberry

Pont lac

8
7

1

5
1

1

342

101

1

28
31
23

28
13
20

19
5
4

1

26
10
26
16
37
33
126
232

46
23
11
15

3

1660 1133

294

Psychopathlc

M

F

H

F

M

F

H

11

19

2
39

2
33

1
27

2
14

14

2
1

247
131
20
1

98
36
4
1

34
34
8

20
10
2

37

38
6
2

12
11
5
1

1

26
22
13
43
209
8
251

3
34
122
1

Kalamazoo

23
14
39
7
2
6
9 16
68
69 .
5
30
179 210

9
23

3
4

5
49
108

3
92
1
49

7
2
3

6
16

P

M

2
4
2
1
9

9
9
1
2
29

4

4

32

61

1
10
70

33

38

1
77

130

82
8
1

Ypsilantt

F

H

F

42

1
24

2
34

45 103
30 163
1
15
1
2

79

2
66

3
2
1
16
5

Traverse
City

45
7
2

42 32
54
7
9
7
22 25
76 129
1
6

M
>

7

7
79

41
3
15
30
10
147

24
37
20
97

209

193

(-H

50

10
23
47

8
6
9

9
3
14

4
3
22

11
1
29

43 36
3
3
54 110

18
18
13

18
5
16

22
16
21

33
9
49

7
31
55
82

1
14
34
30

2

1

8
6
63

6

3
21
6
31

6
20
84

17

26

5
20
4
25

10

5
1
1

60

10
22
66
43

2
26
69
12

18
23
4
26

19
19
19
10

18

998

691

408

273

272

224

415

415

743

452

849

728

2

X

o
fe
^

18

19
19
31

3

hH
O

1
3

a
K
o
00
^
M

Table XV

1931-1934 FIRST ADMISSIONS IN PERCENTAGE RELATION WITH PRINCIPAL PSYCHOSES

Psychoses
Dementia Praecox
Manic Depressive
General Paralysis
Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

~

Period
Psycho- Traverse
Average Eloise Ionia Kalamazoo Newberry Pontiac pathic
City
Ypsilanti
22.14
11.24
10.98
8.93

21.3
11.8
15.5
1.6

32.7
.6
6.4
4.1

23.0
8.1
9.8
20.4

23.1
20.7
:
6.5
-•'.'•
7.9

14.3
12.3
9.9
9.9

Senile
Psychoneuroses
Alcoholic
Paranoia & Paranoid conditions

6.48
4.86
3.89
3.20

10.8
1.5
6.3
2.0

1.9
2.2
2.2
6.8

3.4
4.6
2.7
1.7

8.8
3.4
3.9
2.5

5.6
10.5
2.2
3.0

Other Somatic Diseases
Cerebral Syphilis
With Mental Deficiency
With Epilepsy

2.31
1.76
2.81
1.65

2.7
2.8
1.4
1.6

1.6
3.2
8.9
1.6

1.4
1.4
2.6
2.5

1.1
1.5
2.1
1.3

1.2
2.1
8.3
.9

25.6
13.0
13.2
11.5

18.8
15.8
2.4
.9

20.4
5.6
9.4
14.6

19.7
.6
9.6

9.0
2.4
3.4
3.0

3.7
4.4
3.9
3.5

1.7

3.2

3.0
1.4
2.7
1.6

.7
1.1

.7

3.9
1.9

.

a;
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n
H

3

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I?
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GO

With Psychopathic Personality
Other Nervous Diseases
Involution Melancholia
All Others

1.72
2.78
.94
1.16

Without Psychoses
Uhdiagnosed Psychoses

9.06
4.09

2.0

1.3
3.0
.9
1.7

1.0
2.8
2.5
.3

2.3
4.7
.4
1.4

11.3
2.0

17.4
4.4

4.6
11.3

2.3
1.4

.5
1.7
.1
.6

1.5
3.0

.3

.4
2.2
2.1
1.9

5.1
3.8

6.6
5.2

13.1
1.2

1.3
2.4
.3
1.4

15.7
2.9

12.8
2.5

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

XVI - PSYCHOSIS PERCENTAGES BY YEARS

The variation in percentage of total first admissions to all mental hospitals for each of the last four years for the various types of
psychoses are here shown. Dementia praecox shows marked variations each
year, which is true to a lesser degree in the case of psychoneuroses.
A comparison of the psychosis percentages for 1931 to 1934 with
those of 1922-1926, as given by Doctor Barrett's 1927 report on Michigan
Hospitals, is provided by the first two columns of this table. This indicates a definite increase for dementia praecox and a proportionate reduction in the instance of manic depressive, general paralysis and cerebral arteriosclerosis over the last four years.
XVII - COMPARISON OF SEX AND PRINCIPAL PSYCHOSIS

This table shows the relation of sex in the principal psychosis
for first admissions occurring from 1931 to 1934 inclusive. These figures
are here compared with a similar study for 1921 to 1926 from Doctor Barrett's report and additional data for 1906 to 1912 taken from a report
issued in 1915 by a commission appointed to investigate insanity in Michigan. A definite increase in the percentage of female cases is clearly
shown as occurring since 1906 for both dementia praecox and senile psychoses.
Since 1921 the percentage of female cases has shown marked increases in
the instances of cerebral arteriosclerosis, psychoneuroses and alcoholic
psychosis. Male cases indicate increasing percentages in the case of paranoid conditions and also for psychoses with other nervous diseases.
XVIII - YEARLY ADMISSIONS RELATED TO AGE GROUPS

The total first admissions occurring each year from 1931 to 1934
in all eight mental hospitals are shown divided for each year by age
groups, representing the ages of patients on their respective admission
dates. Each of these year's totals of admissions show slight variation
in their distribution over the different age groups and the average age
at admission has remained practically fixed as shown on the bottom line.
The two five year age groups within which the greatest number of admissions occur are those from 35 to 45 years, including therein about 23 per
cent of the total. Prom 15 to 35 years there are included fully one third
of the entire number admitted each year and from 70 years and over, about
one tenth.
In order to cite a definite trend of increase or decrease in any
of the above age groups, this study by years should be extended over a
much longer period. Table XIX contains figures taken from separate
periods several years apart.

38

Table XVI

YEARLY COMPARISONS OP PSYCHOSES PERCENTAGES OP FIRST ADMISSIONS
Average
1922-1926

Average
1931-1934

1931

1932

1933

1934

19.24
13.56
13.45
9.19

22.14
11.24
10.98
8.93

24.80
11.03
10.09
8.95

20.17
10.92
11.13
8.88

20.50
11.47
11.80
8.68

22.57
11.12
10.81
8.95

Senile
Psychoneuroses and Neuroses
Alcoholic
Paranoia and Paranoid Conditions

7.23
4.50
4.10
4.00

6.48
4.86
3.89
3.20

6.75
3.96
3.73
3.19

5.78
4.85
3.94
3.31

6.43
5.55
3.54
2.74

6.98
4.96
4.20
3.53

With Other Somatic Diseases
Cerebral Syphilis
With Mental Deficiency
With Epilepsy

2.66
2.31
2.18
1.48

2.31
1V76
2.81
1.65

1.78
2.49
2.33
1.34

2.34
1.68
2.11
1.97

2.48
1.47
3.80
1.81

2.83
1.23
2.96
1.38

Psychopathic Personality
Other Nervous Diseases
Involution Melancholia
Drugs and Toxins

1.60
.91
.56
.39

1.72
2.78
.94
.51

1.22
1.85
.94
.59

1.49
3.35
.62
.78

2.20
3.02
.95
.34

1.69
2.87
1.26
.22

Traumatic
With Huntington's Chorea
Brain Tumor
With Pellagra

.21
.21
.13
.03

.31
.27
.07
.00

.23
.27
.00
.00

.30
.30
.00
.00

.13
.22
.08
.00

.61
.22
.09
.00

7.17
4.69

9.06
4.09

8.36
6.10

10.32
5.76

8.17
4.62

8.63
2.89

Psychoses
Dementia Praecox
Manic Depressive
General Paralysis
Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

Without Psychoses
Dndiagnosed Psychoses

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40

Table XVIII
X

1931
P

FIRST ADMISSIONS BY YEARS AS RELATED TO ASE GROUPS
Percentage
Total of total

M

1932
F

Percentage
Total of total

M

1933
F

Percentage
Total of total

11

1934
F

Percentage
Total of total

Under 15 yrs. 35

14

49

1.9

37

19

56

2.1

16

3

19

0.9

4

7

11

0.5

15 - 19

67

38

105

4.2

96

55

151

6.6

60

43

103

4.6

54

33

87

4.1

20-24

114

82

196

7.8

125

91

216

8.1

99

71

170

7.6

113

78

191

9.1

25-29

116

96

212

8.4

112

109

221

8.2

126

90

216

9.6

113

93

206

9.7

30 - 34

170

100

270

10.7

149

118

267

9.9

133

105

238

10.5

123

79

202

9.6

35-39

175

102

277

10.9

153

148

301

11.2

154

115

269

11.8

112

105

217

10.2

40 - 44

179

124

303

12.0

187

136

323

12.1

162

91

253

11.2

142

93

235

11.2

45 - 49

132

112

244

9.7

164

90

254

9.5

147

81

228

10.1

117

97

214

10.2

50 - 54

130

83

213

8.4

122

80

202

7.5

108

75

183

8.2

118

71

189

9.0

55 - 59

93

66

159

6.3

93

63

156

5.8

78

50

128

5.7

72

52

124

5.9

60 - 64

91

56

147

5.8

82

51

133

4.9

59

59

118

5.3

66

53

119

5.6

65 - 69

59

30

89

3.5

70

41

111

4.2

61

41

102

4.4

67

, 31

98

4.6

169

91

260

10.3

171

123

294

10.9

132

89

221

9.8

129

82

211

10.0

Unascertained
0
Totals 1530

0

0
2524

0
100.0

0
1561

0
1124

0
2685

0
100.0

5
1340

1
914

6
2254

.3
100.0

3
1233

3
877

6

994

2110

.3
100.0

44.0

43.4

43.8 years

43.8

44.0

70 & over

Average Age

44.3

43.9

44.1 years

43.9 years

44.6

43.6

44.2 years

1
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MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

XIX - COMPARISON OF AOE GROUPS OVER DIFFERENT PERIODS

Here are shown at three different periods the admissions to state
mental hospitals divided by ages of patients on their admission date.
That for the year 1912 is taken from the committee report on insane
issued in 1915.
From Dr. Barrett's 1927 report is shown the group of
admissions occurring from 1917 to 1926 and compared with these is the
total of first admissions for the years 1933 and 1934.
It is noted that
the age group from 35 to 40 years is the one containing the largest per
cent of cases in all three of the periods given in the table. The percentage of those admitted in 1912 who were 70 years old and over is considerably less than for the same group in the two later periods.

XX - AOE GROUPS IN RELATION WITH PRINCIPAL PSYCHOSES

The first admissions to all eight mental hospitals during the
years 1933 and 1934 are here shown divided by age groups and also indicating how these same age groups are distributed over eight principal
psychoses.
In the fourth column the total admissions In each age group are
compared with each 100,000 of the same age as shown in Michigan's population by the 1930 census. This clearly indicates the age group, from
which the highest proportion are admitted for mental disorders, is that
of 70 years and over.
As regards the different psychoses and ages on admission, it is
shown that manic depressive and general paralysis are distributed quite
generally over the whole range of age groups. Those diagnosed as dementia praecox are most evident in early adult life with almost fifty per
cent of patients with this psychosis, occurring in 1933 and 1934, being
admitted at not over 30 years of age.

42

Table XIX

COMPARISON OP ADMISSIONS BY AQE OROUPS IN PERCENTAGES

1912

Male

Female

Total

Male

.7
3.9
8.3

Under 15
15-19
20-24
25-29

.42

.43

4.22
8.65
10.75

4.00
8.13
11.05

.42
4.12
8.42
10.89

10.3

30 - 34
35-39
40-44
45-49

10.44
10.87
10.30
8.85

12.28
11.97
10.95
10.87

11.26
11.36
10.59
9.48

12.2
12.6
9.8
8.2

1917 to 1926
Female
Total

Male

2 yrs. 1933-1934

.7
3,9
7.0
10.6

.7
3.9
7.7
10.4

.8
4.4
8.3
9.2

12.2
12.4

12.8
18.5

10.0
10.4

10.5

10.1

11.4
10.8

9.7

8.8

Female

.5
4.2
8.1
10.2 •
10.3

12.1
10.1
9.9

Total

.7
4.3
8.2
9.7
10.2
11.8
11.1
10.1

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rt
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H
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f

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50-54
55-59
60 - 64

13.99

65 - 69

9.70

8.77

9.28*

70 and over
Unascertained

8.5
3.3

6.53
2.36

7.63
2.99

# 10 year periods

13.24

13.66#

7.8

6.4
5.6
5.4
4.6

5.9
4.7
3.5

10.4
1.5

9.6
1.2

7.0
5.7
5.1
4.3

9.2
6.0
4.4
5.1

7.8
5.1
6.3
2.1

8.7
5.7
5.8
4.7

10.1

9.7
.3

9.3

9.6

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STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

XXI - ADMISSIONS BY COUNTRIES OF BIRTH AND PARENTAQE

The total first admissions for the four year period, 1931-1934,
with relation to psychoses, are here shown divided according to the birth
and parentage of the patient. Outside of those connected with United
States and Canada, patients born in, or having parents born in, Poland
and Germany make up about one third of the balance. The figures given
on the bottom line of the table indicate the average proportionate number admitted yearly in relation to each 100,000 persons of that particular country in the state's population by the 1930 census. Austria, Hungary and Ireland show proportionately high admission rates, almost double
the average rate. England and Scotland have rates near or below the
average, while Holland is the lowest of the group. As compared with a
similar compilation, shown by Table XII for current resident population,
almost the same countries appear as above or below the average in a varying ratio.
XXII -PSYCHOSES PERCENTAGES BY COUNTRIES OF PARENTAGE

This table shows the relative frequency with which the principal
psychoses occur in the first admissions, as divided between the important
countries noted in the preceding tabulation. Italy, Austria, Poland,
Russia and the Slavic countries have the highest percentages for dementia
praecox, with England, Ireland and Scotland the lowest for this disorder.
Finland is shown to be far ahead with manic depressive psychosis. England,
Ireland and Scotland lead in cerebral arteriosclerosis and senile psychoses
and Ireland, Austria, Poland and Slavic countries have the largest percentage in alcoholic psychosis.
XXIII - PSYCHOSES OF FIRST ADMISSIONS AS DIVIDED BY NATIVITY

In this table the first admissions for the four year period, 19311935, are divided between native and foreign born, showing a trifle over
74 per cent of them to be native born. Of these native born 52 per cent
have both parents who are also native born. Both the native and foreign
born are each divided according to psychoses and in the last two columns
are given the percentages of total cases for each psychosis for both native and foreign born groups. This shows dementia praeoox cases to be
relatively more numerous with the native born, while senility, arteriosclerosis and manic depressive are among the type of cases proportionately higher in number among the foreign born. With reference to general
paralysis and dementia praecox, there is a much smaller proportion of female cases shown as applying to the foreign born.

45

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Table XXI
continued:

PSYCHOSES OF FIRST ADMISSIONS 1931-1934 DIVIDED BY COUNTRIES OF BIRTH AND PARENTAGE
Hungary
M
P

Traumatic
Senile
Cerebral Arteriosclerosis
General Paralysis

4
2
10

2
1
2

Ireland
M
F
19
21
18

24
19
6

Italy
M
F
5
2
18

1

1

4

3

5

1

1

50
1
6
23

5
6
14
44

5

1
2
17

2
9

1
2
3
21

1
140

6
78

38

2
24

2

22
7
8

9
3
12

1
2
2

4
2
7

3
2
6

9
10
20
63

16
8
20

3
3
5
11

2
3
2
3

3
1
1
4

66 452

247

117

85

63

5
16

4
12

15

1
14

Involution Melancholia
Dementia Praeeox
Paranoia & Paranoid
conditions
With Epilepsy
Psyehoneuroses
With Psychopathic Personal'
7—
With Mental Deficiency
TJndlagnoaed Psychoses
Without Psychoses

0
19

3
17

1
23

2
11

39

19

1
0
3

3

8
4
2

6
3
5

5
1
5

5

3
1

1
6
4

1
1
3
5

1
2

3

3
2
5
16

13

64 161

105

124

2

18

1

5

5
12
23

7
3
1
14

5
0
2
11

3

10
9
10

4

Alcoholic
Drugs and Toxins
Other Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive

2

Sweden &
Norway
M
F

4
6
20

4

4
2
1

Scotland
M
F

8
3
8

3
0
0
4

1

Russia
M
F

14
15
38

Cerebral Syphilis
Huntlngton's Chorea
Brain Tumor
Other Nervous Diseases

3

Poland
M
F

1

4
1
1
3

7
4
1

5 94 108
6 219 117
1 339 121
1

2

1

1
6

United
States
M
F

42
10
1
72

Others
M
F

Unknown
M
F

10
14
53

11
4
9

2
27
89
55

9

3

12

32
39
21

21
3
2
37

1
10

4

19

8

17
2
5
19

2
1
5
34

11

1

3

3

9
24

9
22

1
40

3

70

61

2
49

61 52
51 27
82 147

8
4
12

7
4
9

9
2
9

6
5
18

1
2
3
13

9
17
19
39

5
11
17
18

7
2

6

4
11

1
7

2 111
21
1
7 16
1 43 45
23 149 204

9

4

1
36

4
3 28
25 459 388

4
1
4

4
2
4

5
1
5
1

2
5

1
4
7
7

55
19
72 43
3 73 80
2 237 123

5
5
10
21

50 121

88 2187 1603

275

32

Total

8
80

3

6

153 419 275

1-3
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49

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

XXIV - PSYCHOSES OP FIRST ADMISSIONS DIVIDED BY RACES

T&e total first admissions for the four year period, 1931 to
1954, are here again divided by psychoses shown in relation with the
different races, which classification agrees with the Dictionary of
Races in use by the Federal Immigration Commission.
In percentage of total cases the African group has a high
figure of 19.8 per cent for general paralysis and 26.5 per cent for
dementia praecox. Out of 106 cases among Hebrews 30 per cent are
listed as dementia praecox. Those listed under the Irish race indicate a relatively high percentage for senile dementia of 14.6 per
cent. With the Italian and the Magyar, manic depressive psychosis
is proportionately high with percentages of 16.5 and 17 respectively
of total cases admitted. For the English race there ia a comparative
low of 15.7 per cent for cases of dementia praecox, while with the
Italian 28.5 per cent of total admissions were reported as this psychosis.

XXV - READMISSIONS

1931-1934

The total readmissions received in all hospitals during the
four year period ending December 31, 1934, are here shown by institutions and in relation with the types of psychoses. Newberry and
Pontiac show the highest proportion of readmissions, with one fifth
and one quarter respectively of all their admissions being of this
type. In relation to sex, females show a higher proportion for readmissions than for first admissions. The proportions are 48 per
cent of the total readmissiona and 41 per cent of the total first admissions during the last four year period.

50

FIRST ADMISSIONS BY RACE AND PSYCHOSES - 4 YEAR PERIOD 1931-1934

Table XXIV

Total

African
(black)
M
F

American
Indian
F
M

M

F

T

Senile
Cerebral Arterioscleroses8
General Paralysis
Other Nervous Diseases

300
590
819
167

320
280
232
99

620
870
1051
266

17
16
92
9

29
10
41
6

3
1

0

Alcoholic

331
96
436
18

42
125
639
72

373
221
1075
90

27
12
13

10
12
24

1

0

Other Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive
Involution Melancholia

Hebrew

Irish

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

56
45
117
11

60
21
28
11

35
53
72
13

43
27
20
12

0
6
1

4
0
1

33
25
36
7

34
16
8
5

40
9
46
1

1
5
79
2

30
6
50
2

0
11
63
13

6

2
15
1

29
4
21
2

4
3
25
3

31
11
7
6

30
7
4
10

74
10
5
26

100
11
10
19

79
14

19

27

3

17
4
1
6

2
10
18
13

9
10
27
86

8
7
23
49

11
18
47
53

3
9
24
34

2
1
2
6

2
1
6

4
5
15
31

1
2
8
16

254

590

409

530

379

46

60

267

176

918
146
57
288

2114
307
158
465

117
10
10
2

64
7
3
5

.allty 122
160
389
576

42
109
275
290

164
269
617
866

15
12
32
26

6639

3934

9573

410

Total

1

German

85
14
14
20

Dementia Praecox
1196
Paranoia & Paranoid con itlon 161
101
With Epilepsy
Psychoneuroses
177
With Mental Deficiency
All Other Psychoses
Without Psychoses

1

1

English

1
1
1
1

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52

Table XXV

READMISSIONS - 1931-1934 - BY PSYCHOSES

Elolse
M
M
Traumatic
Senile
Cerebral Arterioscleroses
General Paralysis
Cerebral Syphilis
Huntlngton's Chorea
Brain Tumor
Other Nervous Diseases
Alcoholic
Drugs and Toxins
Other Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive

2
4
11

FF

Ionia
Kalamazoo
Kalamazoo
M
PF
M
FF
M
M

6
2
5

1
1
2
2

1
1
10
9

2
5

1

3

1

2

2
9

2
1

Pontlao
M
M
FF
1
1
3

Psychopathie
M
F

2

1
4
12

1

1

2
1

Traverse
City
Ypsllantl
M
P
P
M
1
1
1
2

1
1
6
5

M

Total
F

T

1
3
1

5
9
25
51

1
3
12
16

6
17
37
67

1

7

4
1

11
1

15
1 5

9

2 4
24

1
4

2

9

3

o
3
34

8
o
67

1 11
Involution Melancholia
Dementia Praeeox
57
38
Paranoia & Paranoid condition
>
>
tlon 4
4
4
2
With Epilepsy
2
Psychoneuroses
llty 6
6
With Psychopathic Personality
1
With Mental Deficiency
Undlagnosed Psychoses
5
15
Without Psychoses
Total

Newberry
M
M
PF

164

1
1

3
3
1

10
2
1
j.
51

47

35

28

63
63
' 4'
3

60
36
22
>2 • *3 • 3'
3
1
1
7
1
5
11
11

1
2
1
1
12

4

2

2
2
5
13
21

5

7

602

158

95

76

2
2
11
- 4•

2
3
2
4
21

1
7
5
1
4

170

45

1
1

2
2

2
2
• 1>

1

3

4

1
24

1

3

1 1 1
1

6
6
7

1

50

1
j.
40

36

1 11 2 2
6
27
29
6
*
•=
*
3
5
3
2
2
1

35
i
1
2

2
44
66
53 254 225 479
"2 " • 25
=
•12
" > > "47
>
2
11
14
25

1
2
e
31

1
j.
10

1
±
6
6

18
"
2
2

15
15
"
4

7
»
2

3
3
1

4

5

9
5
4
1
5

71

81

8
1

5
1
1
±
28

33

11

§
ra

38
6
44
3
2
5
7Y J 11. J 18
. J . B M
217 272 489
O

2

2
4

3
4
8
9
7

4
3
5
9
1

5
4
4
5
5

2
14
3

21
28
25
34
71

26

39

120

116

128

130

851

45
14
21
41
52

66
42
46
75
123

777 1628

^
f>
^

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

XXVI - READMISSIONS BY PERCENTAGES

The readmissiona for four years in all hospitals are here
shown in relation with the different psychoses by percentages, as
well as with relation to each 100 first admissions having a similar
diagnosis during the same period. Almost 60 per cent of these readmissions were either cases of manic depressive or of dementia
praecox. As related to first admissions, there were 46.8 cases of
manic depressive readmitted to every 100 cases admitted for the
first time. With psychopathic personality there were 37.5 cases readmitted for every 100 first admissions. Dementia praecox cases
show almost one quarter as many readmitted as are first admitted.

XXVII - READMISSION AGE GROUPS WITH PRINCIPAL PSYCHOSES

The readmlssions entering all mental hospitals during the
four year period from 1931 to 1934 inclusive, are here tabulated to
age groups and principal psychoses the same as are first admissions
in Table XX.
As compared with first admissions there is evident a much
smaller proportion of readmissions in the age groups for both the
younger ones up to 20 years old and the aged patients of 65 and over.
Among the principal psychoses, dementia praecox indicates a
larger proportion of readmissions of patients with that disorder who
are from 30 to 50 years of age than occurs in the case of first admissions.

54

1931-1934 READMISSION PERCENTAGES IH RELATION WITH FIRST ADMISSIONS

Table XXVI

Total First
Admissions
Traumatic
Senile
Cerebral Arteriosclerosis
General Paralysis

30
620
870
1051

Cerebral Syphilis
Huntington's Chorea
Brain Tumor
Other Nervous Diseases

169

Alcoholic
Drugs and Toxins
Other Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive

373

26
7
266

Total Readmissions

Per Cent
of total

Per 100 First
Admissions

6
17
37
67

0.3
1.1
2.2
4.2

11
1

.7

6.7

24

1.5

9.8

44
5
18
489

2.7
0.3
1.0

20.0

2.9
4.3
6.6
GO
1-3

K

Involution Melancholia
Dementia Praecox
Paranoia & Paranoid conditions
With Epilepsy Psychoses
Psychoneuros es
With Psychopathic Personality
With Mental Deficiency
Undiagnosed Psychoses
Without Psychoses

Total

48
221
1075

307
158

6
479
47
25

465
164
269
384
866

65
43
46
75
123

9573

1628

90
2114

29.8

0.3
29.6

11.8
10.9

8.4
46.0

6.9

2.9
1.6

23.2
15.8
16.7

4.0
2.6
2.9
4.6
7.7

14.4
26.2
17.9
19.8
14.3

100.0

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Table XXVII continued
General Paralysis

Cerebral Arteriosclerosis

Alcoholic

Psychoneuroses

Paranoia and
Paranoid Condition

F

Under 15
15 - 19
20 - 24
25 - 29

30 - 34
35 - 39

40 - 44
45 - 49

5

.

2
2

0
1

8
10
8
9

2
1
0
4

6
1
4
1

6

1
1
4
7
8

1

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4
5 ;

53
i-3

>
H9

2

2
1
1
1

3
2
3
2

5
9
4
11

3
2
2
3

1
3
2
2

1
4
1
0

2
2
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1

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4
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1

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2
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2

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0

0

2

22

45

25

22

a
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50
55
60
65

-

54
59
64
69

51

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7

4
9

4
2

1
4

0
0
0
0

11

6

2

0

85

12

38

1
1
0

70 & over
Unknown
Total

1

16

4

os

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

TOTAL ADMISSIONS BY COUNTIES

Total admissions, including readmissiona as well as first admissions, for the four year period from 1931 to 1934 inclusive are divided in this table according to counties from which received. The
average yearly total of admissions is shown for each county in the
third column and the number of admissions occurring annually proportionate to each 100,000 persons resident in the county by the 1930
census, is given in the fourth column. The counties of the state are
considered in four main groups, divided geographically over the state.
These conform with a similar grouping of counties appearing in the
1927 Barrett report, in which figures were given on admissions from
counties during 1915, 1920 and 1925. A comparison with this latter
report indicates that in the last four years there has been a marked
falling off in annual admissions from the most of the counties. Wayne
and Jackson counties are important exceptions.

Table XXVIII -

Counties

1931-1934 TOTAL ADMISSIONS BY COUNTIES

1930 County
Population

Admissions

Average

Rate Per
100,000
Population

Genesee
Huron
Lapeer
Livingston

211,641
31,132
28,348
19,274

249
43
41
43

61.5
10.7
10.2
10.7

29.1
34.3
36.1
55.4

Macomb
Monroe
Oakland
Sanilac

77,146
52,485
211,251
27,751

91
99
288
52

22.7
24.8
72.0
13.0

29.4
47.3
34.1
46.8

Shiawassee
St. Clair
Tuscola
Washtenaw
Wayne

39,517
67,563
32,934
65,530
1,888,946

63
112
51
236
4,643

15.7
28.0
12.7
59.0
1160.7

39.7
41.4
38.7
90.2
61.5

Total

2,753,517

6,011

1502.7

54.7

58

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

Table XXVIII oont.

Counties
Alger
Baraga
Chippewa
Delta
Dickinson
Gogebio
Bought on
Iron
Keweenaw
Luce
Maokinac
Marquette
Menominee
Ontonagon
Schoolcraft
Total

TOTAL ADMISSIONS BY COUNTIES

1930 County
Population
9,327
9,168
25,047
32,280
29,941
31,577
52,851
20,805
5,076
6,528
8,783
44,076
23,652
11,114
8.451
318,676

Total
Admissions
55
18
87
106
48

74
151

47
26
31
23
104
61
28
31
890

Yearly
Average
13.7

4.5
21.7
26.5
12.0
18.5
37.7
11.8
6.5
7.7
5.7
26.0
15.2
7.0
7.7
222.5

Rate Per
100,000
Population
137.0
49.0
86.6
82.0
40.2
58.7
71.4
56.7
127.7
117.9
64.9
59.0
64.5
63.0
91.1
69.8

TOTAL ADMISSIONS BY COUNTIES

Counties
Allegan
Barry
Berrien
Branch
Calhoun
;Cass
Eaton
Hillsdale
Ingham
Jackson
Kalamazoo
Kent
Lenawee
Ottawa
St. Joseph
Van Bur en
Total

1930 County
Population
38,974
20,928
81,066
23,950
87,043
20,888
31,778
27,417
116,587
92,304
91,368
240,511
49,849
54,858
30,618
32,637
1,040,776

Total
Admissions
69
49
188

49
180
49
61

79
261
279
315
647
119
63
69
115
2592

59

Yearly
Average
17.2
12.2
47.0
12.2
45.0
12.2
15.2
19.8
65.2
69.7
78.7
161.7
29.7
15.7
17.2
28.7
648.0

Rate Per
100,000
Population
44.2
58.3
57.8
51.1
51.7
58.2
47.8
72.2
56.2
75.6
86.2
67.2
59.5
28.7
56.3
88.0
62.2

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

Counties

1930 County
Population

Alcona
Alpena
Antrim
Arenac
Bay
Benzie
Charlevolx
Cheboygan
Clinton
Clare
Crawford
Burnett
Gladwln
Gd. Traverse
Gratiot
Ionia
losoo
Isabella
Kalkaska
Lake
Leelanau
Manistee
Mason
Mecosta
Midland
Missaukee
Mont calm
Montmorenoy
Muskegon
Newaygo
Oceana
Ogemaw
Osceola
Osooda
Otsego
Presque Isle
Ros common
Saglnaw
Wexford
Total

4,989
18,574
9,979
8,007
69,474
6,687
11,981
11,502
24,174
7,032
3,097
15,109
7,424
20,011
30,252
35,093
7,517
21,126
3,799
4,066
8,206
17,409
18,576
15,738
19,150
6,992
27,471
2,814
84,930
17,029
13,805
6,595
12,806
1,728
5,554
11,330
2,055
120,717
16,827
729,525

Non-residents
Total for State

Total
Admissions

Yearly
Average

Rate Per
100,000
Population

9
42
24
16
148
17
29
35
40
16
5
37
23
84
48
53
14
40
17
11
35
65
47
38
45
4
47
6
156
31
41

2.2
10.5
6.0
4.0
37.0
4.2
7.2
8.7
10.0
4.0
1.2
9.2
5.7
21.0
12.0
13.2
3.5
10.0
4.2
2.7
8.7
16.2
11.7
9.5
11.2
1.0
11.7
1.5
39.0
7.7
10.2
5.0
4.7
1.5
1.2
5.7
2.0
50.0
14.0

44.2
56.5
60.3
49.8
53.2
63.7
60.1
75.6
41.3
56.8
33.0
60.9
76.9
104.8
39.6
37.6
46.6
47.3
110.8
66.5
105.8
92.9
63.0
60.3
58.6
16.0
42.5
53.3
46.0
45.3
73.7
75.8
36.5
86.7
21.6
50.3
97.2
41.3
85.5

20

19
6

5
23
8
200
56
1560

390.0

177
11230

2807.5

60

53.6

DEATHS AND DEATH RATES BY INSTITUTIONS
The total number of deaths occurring each year among patients in residence at each of the eight mental
hospitals is given in this table. These separate totals are compared with the total number of patients under
treatment during the year in each case and in the last four columns are given the resulting death rates in
proportion to each 1000 patients under treatment. The number of patients under treatment is made up of the
total number in residence at the beginning of the year plus all those admitted during the 12 months following*
Table XXIX

-

DEATH RATES IN HOSPITALS BY INSTITUTIONS 1931-1954

in
Total Deaths Per Year
1931
1932
1933
1934
Kalamazoo
Pontiao
Traverse City

Total Patients Under Treatment
1933
1934
1931
1932

Per 1,000 Under Treatment
1931
1932
1933
1934

229

270

182

180

3190

3282

3199

3175

71.7

82.2

56.9

56.7

84

77

80

85

1930

1917

1900

1905

43.5

40.2

42.0

44.6

130

181

158

147

2452

2601

2665

2686

53.2

69.2

59.2

55.0

1-3
>
H
H
g
H
te!
f

a

0
02

Newberry

91

82

72

108

1356

1342

1367

1452

67.2

61.2

52.6

74.2

n

Ionia

24

28

32

22

742

789

892

916

32.3

35.6

35.8

24.0

00

Ypsilanti

32

76

100

93

930

1492

1872

1819

34.4

50.8

53.3

51.2

1

3

2

3

303

348

295

203

3.3

8.6

6.8

14.7

166

216

198

208

2864

3163

3171

3597

57.8

68.1

62.4

57.9

757

933

824

846

13767

14934

15406

15753

55.0

62.5

53.4

53.6

Psychopathic
Eloise

Totals

TOTAL DISCHARGES AND RATES OP DISCHARGE BY INSTITUTIONS
Here are noted the total number of patients discharged each year by each institution. These totals
include patients discharged outright from each institution, those taken from the books due to a continued absence on parole for over a year without reinstatement and those deported to another state or country. Also
Included are patients transferred to a different type of institution within the state, but all cases of shifting or transferring of patients from one mental hospital to another within the state hospital group are entirely separate from these discharge totals. As with the preceding table, these totals are compared with
totals under treatment and the corresponding rates of discharge given in the last four columns.
As noted in previous description of institutions, the Psychopathic Hospital has a large proportion of
patients on observation commitments who are discharged after a short stay at the hospital. This accounts for
the high ratio of discharge from that institution. Considering the remaining seven institutions only, their
combined rate of discharge for 1934 would be 75.4 per thousand under treatment. Adding this figure to the
combined death rate of 53.6 per thousand would give a total of 129 patients who have died or were discharged
for each thousand patients under treatment during 1934.
'

.

Table XXX

-

DISCHARGES BY INSTITUTIONS 1931-1934

Total Discharges Per Year
1931
1933
1934
1932

Kalamazoo

3175
1905
2686
1452

77.8
46.6
35.9
73.1

87.1
45.8
44.2
70.7

87.5
30.5
39.5
62.2

91.8
35.2
55.9
75.6

£

916

16.5
46.2
516.0
99.8

42.6
90.2
528.0
90.2

51.3
103.6
665.0
80.6

77.8

76.3

83.0

246
90
88
99

286
88
115
95

280
58
105
85

292
67
150
110

3190
1930
2452
1356

3282
1917
2601
1342

Ionia
Ypsilanti
Psychopathic
Eloise

11
13
172
316

13
69
180
316

38
169
156
286

47
189
135
319

742
930

1492

. 303
2864

3163

3171

3597

14.8
13.9
568.0
110.2

14934

15406

15753

75.2

Totals,

1035

1162

1177

1309

13767

348

892
1872

295

i
Ho

Pontiae
Traverse City
Newberry

789

X

Discharges Per 1000
Under Treatment
1933
1931
1932
1934

Total Patients Under Treatment
1932
1933
1934
1931
3199
1900
2665
1367

Q

1819

203

00

>

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

XXXI - DEATHS BY INSTITUTIONS AND BY PSYCHOSES

The total deaths occurring during the four years ending December 31, 1934, among all patients on the books of each of the eight
mental hospitals are here tabulated according to the various psychoses
assigned to the different cases after diagnosis. About half of these
deaths are among patients having one of the three psychoses, general
paralysis, cerebral arteriosclerosis and senility. Sixty-three per
cent of the total who died were male patients.

XXXII - DEATH PERCENTAGES BY PSYCHOSES

Of the total deaths during the 1931-1934 period, the percentage
shown as applying to each psychoses is here indicated. These results
are compared with a similar study made in Dr. Barrett's report in 1927
over a five year period from 1922 to 1926 inclusive.
Those types of psychoses which indicate recently either an increase or a reduction in the percentage of deaths over ten years ago
in most cases similarly show a relative increase or reduction in the
percentage of first admissions, as between the same periods. Such
variations in admission percentages are given in Table XVI.
The important exception to this rule is in the case of cerebral
arteriosclerosis which shows a marked increase in percentage of deaths,
while having a small decrease in proportion of first admissions.
General paralysis has a decided decrease in the relative number of
deaths in the later period, although the decrease in admissions during the same interval has been relatively small.

63

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MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

XXXIII- CAUSES OP DEATH IN RELATION WITH PRINCIPAL PSYCHOSES

The causes of the total deaths occurring in the two years of
1933 and 1934 among mental patients on the books of all eight hospitals
are here given in relation with the principal psychoses. These death
causes conform to the International List of causes of death issued by
the Bureau of the Census in 1931.
Diseases of the heart and circulatory system account for a third of these, while cerebral hemorrhage,
general paralysis and other nervous diseases claim about another fourth
of the total. With dementia praecox, fifty one per cent of deaths are
indicated as from tuberculosis and heart disease. Deaths of manic depressive patients were led by heart disease with over 20 per cent of
the total. With general paralysis over 80 per cent of the death causes
were directly related to their disorder.

XXXIV - DEATH RATES RELATED TO PSYCHOSES

The total deaths reported by all hospitals among resident patients during 1934 are shown in this table divided as to psychoses and
compared with the total number of patients under treatment for each
type of psychosis during the same year. This number under treatment
consists of the number in residence at the beginning of the year plus
those admitted during the year.
The last three columns give the compiled death rates for each
psychosis with no calculation made for less than forty cases as a base.
The high death rates are noted for senile dementia, cerebral arteriosclerosis and also for other somatic disease cases. Among male patients
the death rate is proportionately much higher in cases of senile dementia and with other somatic diseases.

66

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

Table XXXIII
CAUSES OP DEATH IN RELATION WITH PRINCIPAL PSYCHOSES - 1933 - 1934

Cerebral
ArterloSenile
M
P
Tuberculosis of Respiratory System
Tuberculosis of Other Organs
ise
Other Infectious or Parasitic Disease
Cancer and other Malignant Tumors
Other General Diseases
Diseases of blood & blood making organs]
1
Chronic Poisonings & Intoxications
25
Cerebral Hemorrhage
General Paralysis of Insane
1
Other Nervous Diseases
Pericarditis
Endocarditis & Myocarditis
Angina Pectoris
Other Diseases of the Heart

30
2

Arterioscleroses
17
3
Gangrene
Other Diseases of Arteries
7
im
Other Diseases of Circulatory system
Bronchitis
Bronchopneumonia
Lob arpneumoni a
>m
Other Diseases of Respiratory system

Total

2

1

5

3
1

3
3
1

3
2

4
1

4

5
1
2

1

35
0
3

17

30
1
2

55
2

34
1
1

11

74
2

24

9
3

3
1

10
3

42
108
31

3
29
9

4

3
5
1

8

3

3
1

1

1

12
8
2

1

Cirrhosis of the Liver
Other Diseases of the Digestive sys.

Nephritis
Diseases of the Bladder

Suicide
Accidental Traumatism
Other External Causes
Cause Unknown or Ill-defined

1

9
5

4
5

1
1

1

Ulcer of the Stomach & Duodenum
Diarrhea and Entritis
Appendicitis
Hernia and Intestinal Obstruction

Other Non-venereal diseases of the
Genitourinary system
Diseases of Skin & Cellular Tissue
Diseases of the Bones
Senility

8
4

General

sclerosis Paralysis Alcoholic
M
P
M
P
M
P

1

1

2

1
2

32

1
1

1
1
1
1

2

1

1

16

2
3

3
2

7

120

118

218

67

1
1
1
3
106

2
9

3

3

219

48

37

4

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS
Table XXXIII oont.
CAUSES OP DEATH IN RELATION WITH PRINCIPAL PSYCHOSES - 1933 - 1934

Manic Depressive
M
F
Tuberculosis of Respiratory systemi
5
Tuberculosis of Other Organs
Other Infectious or Parasitic disease
;ase
Cancer and other Malignant Tumors
Other General Diseases
Diseases of blood and blood making
organs
1
Chronic Poisonings & Intoxicationsi
1
Cerebral Hemorrhage
9
General Paralysis of Insane
Other Nervous Diseases
7
Pericarditis
Endocarditis & Myocarditis
Angina Pectoris
Other Diseases of the Heart
Arterioscleroses
Gangrene
Other Diseases of Arteries
Other Diseases of Circulatory

11

4

4

3

41
1
1
9

5

3
1

1

3

1

5

14

10

3

4

7

2

2

30

25

9

1
4

1

7

1

3

4

1

1

5

2

Cirrhosis of the Liver
Other Diseases of Digestive system
Nephritis
Diseases of the Bladder
Other Non-venereal diseases of the
Genitourinary system
Diseases of Skin & Cellular Tissue
Diseases of the Bones
Senility

3

1

13
4

1

11
1
1

6

3

10

2

5
1

5

1

2

1
3

3
5

2

sys.

Ulcer of the Stomach & Duodenum
Diarrhea and Entritis
Appendicitis
Hernia & Intestinal Obstruction

36

4

1

Bronchitis
Bronchopneumonia
Lobarpneumonia
Other Diseases of Respiratory sys.

Suicide
Accidental Traumatism
Other External Causes
Cause Unknown or Ill-defined

Involution
MelanDementia
Paranoid
oholia
Praecox Conditions
M
P
M
F_
M _...._.?_.

6
5
1

4
5
1

1
1

8
8
3

7
3

4

1

1

1

2

1
1

2

6

4
1

2
2

1
1

1
1
1

1
2

1

4
2
1
2
65

5

1

2
1

2
70

1

1

1
1

1

1

6

3

5

1

8 159 129

39

1 - Includes Group "Without Psychoses'

1
1

32

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

Table XXXIII cent.
CAUSES OP DEATH IN RELATION WITH PRINCIPAL PSYCHOSES - 1933 - 1934
With
Epilepsy
M
P

Psychoneuroses
M
F

3

2

14

1

2

1

12
7
7

3

1

8

11

1

1

All Other (1)
Psychoses
M
F
M

1

1

2

With
Mental
Deficiency
M
P

2

1

1

6

1
2

1

3

2
1

1
1

15
1
6
3
4

75
4
25
21
8

79
2
17

2

6
4
153
109
82

6

58
29
40

12
4
211
138
122

1
191
5
9

2
144
6
7

3
335
11
16

3

1

1

1
35
2
2

1
25

5

7
1

120
7
8
2

58
3
3
4

178
10
11
6

3
5

47
49
9

32
32

4

79
81
15
10
5
3
15

7
10
1

9

1

10

2
1
1

1

1
1

1

2

1

2
7

5
1
8

1

1
2

3
10
9

1
5
8

4
15
17

3
4
1
17

1
1
32

4
4
2
49

16
5
6
41
1069

10
3
6
18
656

26
8
12
50
1725

1

1
1
1
3
1
13

1
19

1
9

1
8

18

12

23
8

154
6
42
14
16

7

1

1

T

19
1
21

1
1

Total
P

6
1
1
9
167

3
1
2
102

Table XXXIV - 1934 DEATH RATES IN RELATION WITH TYPES OF PSYCHOSES
Patients Under Treatment
Male

Female

Total

Traumatic
Senile
Cerebral Arterioscleroses
General Paralysis

28
240
416
863

17
337
216
262

45
577
632

Cerebral Syphilis
Huntington's Chorea
Brain Tumor
Other Nervous Diseases

171
21
4
183

91
19
3
93

Alcoholic
Drugs and Toxins
Other Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive

437
16
70
676

Involution Melancholia
Dementia Praecox
Paranoia & Paranoid conditions
With Epilepsy
Psychoneuroses and Neuroses
With Psychopathic Personality
With Mental Deficiency
Undiagnosed Psychoses
Without Psychoses

Total

Deaths For Year
Female

Total

3
62
104
99

1
59
53
25

4
121
157
124

262
40
7
276

12
2
1
18

4
3

46
17
91

483
33
161

1084

1760

1125

Male

Deaths Per 1000 Under Treatment
Male

Female

Total

258.0
250.0
114.8

175.0
245.0
95.5

87.2
210.0
249.2
110.2

70.2

44.0

61.1
135.0

7

16
5
1
25

98.4

75.2

90.5

18
1
14
27

1
2
12
33

19
3
26
60

41.2

21.7

200.0
40.0

132.0
30.4

39.3
91.0
161.5
34.1

5
72
20
11

5
148
42
21

21.4
55.8
65.4

67.5
23.5
42.8
122.2

41.6
22.4
48.8
86.6

3
3

21.6
17.5
20.7
50.6
29.7

15.2
39.0
17.3
34.3
28.9

17.9
24.0
19.2
44.0
29.4

58.3

47.9

53.6

0

46

74

120

3561

3060

6621

394
153

467
90

861
243

0
76
22
10

139
172
341
257
607

197
77
231
175
311

336
249
572
432
918

3
3
7
13
18

4
6
19

6
6
11
19
27

8795

6958

15753

513

333

846

o

ffl

Hi

H

w

O
OS

F
GO

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

XXXV - AVERAGE AGE AND HOSPITAL LIFE

The total deaths occurring among all hospital patients on the
books for the four year period, together with the average hospital
life in each case and the average age at death, all divided according
to psychosis are listed in this table. Dementia Praecox and Paranoid
Conditions show the longest average life period with Senility and
General Paralysis among the shortest in length of life. In comparison
with the 1927 report on Michigan mental hospitals, the average life
for Dementia Praecox has lengthened from 11.8 years to 17.8 years,
while the general average has increased from 4.5 years to 6.6 years.

XXXVI - TOTAL DISCHARGES BY INSTITUTIONS AND PSYCHOSIS

This table covers all discharges for four years and gives the
number of patients under the different psychosis discharged by each
institution. These discharges are made up of different types as described under Table XXX. The psychosis showing the highest percentage
of discharges is that of Manic Depressive with an average of 20 per
cent, with Dementia Praecox next with 19 per cent. Hewberry shows onethird of its total discharges as Manic Depressives and 22 per cent of
Ypsilanti's total was discharged as Dementia Praecox. Cases diagnosed
as Cerebral Arteriosclerosis made up over 6 per cent of Kalamazoo discharges, while the total average for this psychosis was 2.8 per cent.

XXXVII - DISCHARGES - RATES OP RECOVERY

The total discharges for the four year period are shown as to
those recovered, improved and unimproved and in relation with the different psychoses. The rate of recovery, etc., per 100 admissions of
the specific psychosis during the same period has been determined in
each case and listed in this table. No calculations were made where
the number admitted was less than 25.
In the case of patients who are discharged after a period of a
year on parole, their condition on discharge will be determined in
different ways. When possible it may be ascertained by the visit of
a social worker or the patient visiting a clinic. If this cannot be
done at the end of the years absence, the condition of the patient at
the time of leaving the hospital is noted to specify condition on discharge.

71

Table XXXV- AVERAGE AQE AT DEATH AND YEARS OP HOSPITAL LIFE 1931-1934

Psychoses

Average Length of Hospital Life
Total Deaths in Period
Male
Female
Total
Average Age at Death
M
F
T
Yrs.
Mos.
Yrs.
Mos.
Yrs.
Mos.
H
F
T

Traumatic

4
232
486
401

6
230
207
84

10
462
693
485

3
1
2
2

2
10
7
4

1
2
2
2

7
11

Cerebral Syphilis
Huntington's Chorea
Brain Timor
Other Hervous Diseases

58
18
2
62

18
6
1
28

76
24
3
90

4
4
0
2

2
3
4
8

4
6
0
2

Alcoholic
Drugs and Toxins
Other Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive

72
4
45
119

7
4
61
139

79
8
106
258

7
22
2

4
11
11
3

18
11
2
9

8
1
10

Involution Melancholia
Dementia Praecox
Paranoia 8c Paranoid condition
n
Epileptic Psychoses

7
348
28

19
257
69
27

26
605
145
55

16
4

11
11
9
6

6
18
16
6

7
3
4
11

6
6
10
3
11

9
1
6
11
7

6
8
10
1
11

6

5

7

Senile
Cerebral Arterioscleroses
Oeneral Paralysis

2
4

2
2
2
2

6
6
6
4

57
77
70
49

78
76
72
45

65
77
70
48

7

4

S

4

4
0
2

9

55
52
24
49

58
52
24
48

55
52
24
49

9
14
2
8

10
5

65
56
52
58

59
63
54
58

3

5
8

58
70
55
58

7

66
50
65
47

55
54
66
52

58
52
66
49

a
ra

16
5

8
6
7
5

3
10
6
11
2

6
7
10
3
11

6
1
6
3
6

46
49
48
56
49

51
60
60
55
50

48
53
50
56
49

0

6

7

57.5

1 ,
6

3

7

g
h-(
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Q

2!

CO

Psychoneuroses
With Psychopathic Personality
y
With Mental Deficiency
Undlagnosad Psychoses
Without Psychoses

Totals

76

16

12

12

7

31
68
76

21
37
40

28
19
52
105
116

2165

1280

3446

7
17

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7

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74

STATE MENTAL HOSPITALS

XXXVIII - DISCHARGE RATES IN RELATION WITH PSYCHOSES

The total discharges for the year 1934, listed according to
psychoses are here shown compared with the number of cases of the
same diagnosis which were under treatment during the year. This rate
of discharge is indicated as being relatively high in the case of
psychoneuroses, as well as psychoses due to drugs and toxins. The
rate for female patients discharged is especially high in the case
of the former.

XXXIX - DISCHARGES AND -TEARS OP HOSPITAL LIFE

Here the total discharges for the four year period are shown
in relation with the different psychoses and the average period during which patients under each psychosis have been on the records of
the hospital. This of necessity includes time during which the patient may have been away from the institution for periods of a year
or less. This indicates the fact that of these patients discharged,
but few have been listed on the hospital records for periods in excess of three or four years, with most of them limited to an interval
of between one and two years.
With an average period of one year and eleven months for the
total discharged and an average stay of six years and seven months
for the number who have died in the same four year interval, the
general average period during which the average patient is remaining
on the state hospital record is now three years and eleven months.

75

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76

Table XXXIX

DISCHARGES 1931-1934 YEARS OP HOSPITAL LIFE IN RELATION WITH TYPES OP PSYCHOSES
Hale

Total Discharges
Female
Total

Male
Yrs.

Traumatic
Senile
Cerebral Arterioscleroses
General Paralysis
Cerebral Syphilis
Huntington's Chorea
Brain Tumor
Other Nervous Diseases

5
40
35
67

17
65
134
303

1
1

37

33

85
4
3
70

2
1

2

28
1
1

12
25
99
236

57
3

2
2

0
1

Average Length of Hospital Life
Female
Total
Mos.
Mos.
Mos.
Yrs.
Yrs.

1
1

10
8
1
3

11
4
2
4

1
1
1
2

9
10
9
0

9
4
3
11

1
0
0
1

7
3
3
5

2
1
0
1

10

6

99
8
7
7

1
1 1
1
2
2

1
11
1
1

9
7 7
7
11
11

2
2
2
1

11
5
4
6

1
4
6
5
6

11

2

2

5
1

3
8

N

Alcoholic
Drugs a n d Toxins
Other Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive

._ _
212
24
20 2 0
27 2 7
80
37
400
538
400
538

236
47 4 7
117
938
938

1
1 1
1
1
,

Involution Melancholia
Dementia Praecox
Paranoid conditions
Epileptic

10
530
69
32

37
366
76
15

47
896
145
47

2
2
2
1

4
4
1
8

3
2
2
1

0

Psychoneuroses
Psychopathic Personality
Mental Deficiency
tfadiagnosed Psychoses
Without Psychoses

120
73
55
96
416

247
31
36
109
212

367
104
91
339
628

1
1
2
1
1

1

1
1

1
7
1

2
10
6

7
0
0
7
6

0

1

7

1
1
2
1
1

1

11

1

2
1

5

5 5

5



Totals

2630

2053

4683

1

11

^
g

^

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

CHANSES IN HOSPITAL POPULATION

Prom the record of discharges over the four year period from
1931 to 1934 inclusive, it has been possible to determine the rate of
change in the hospital population of the entire state.
During the year 1931 there was a total of 3444 patients admitted to the state mental hospitals, including the large number transferred to the new Ypsilanti Hospital from other institutions. Of this
number 353, or 10.5 per cent, had been in the institution for periods
of three months or less before they were discharged. A total of 575.
or 16.6 per cent of the total group admitted, were discharged follow
ing a period of six months or less after admission to the institution,
and 756, or 21.95 per cent, had been discharged after being at the institution for a period of one year or less.
At the completion of the four years there were 979 patients, or
28.3 per cent of the total admitted in 1931, who had left the institution and were later discharged after remaining there for the four year
period or less.
The number admitted to the State Psychopathic Hospital is not
considered in this connection, as a large percentage of those were on
observation orders and the remainder later committed were transferred
in a few months to the different state hospitals.
On January 1, 1931 the total book population of the eight mental hospitals included in this report was 12025 patients. By the close
of the four year period to December 31, 1934,1770 of this group of
patients had died, 1812 had been discharged, and 346 of the original
group were still on parole. Of the number on the original date in
residence, 10776, there remained at the close of 1934y8097, or 75$.

XL - PAROLED PATIENTS

The number of patients paroled on December 31, 1934 and shown
in relation with each psychosis is here divided by institutions.
Of the civil insane and in proportion to individual populations
Ypsilanti has the highest number on parole and Eloise the lowest.
Forty two per cent of the cases paroled are either dementia praecox
or manic depressive. Pontiac indicates almost a third of patients
paroled as manic depressive.
These paroles do not include all absences and will vary with
figures for individual institutions showing total on books at a
specified date.

78

PAROLED PATIENTS - DECEMBER SI, 19S4 IN RELATION WITH TYPES OP PSYCHOSES

Table XL

Paroled
Per Cent Of
Patients Total Patients
M
F
T
Traumatic
Senile
Cerebral Arte
iclerosis
General Paralysisi

3
9
19
86

3
16
7
81 40
36 122

0.2
1.1
2.7

Cerebral Syphilisi
Mervous Diseases
Alcoholic
Drugs and Toxins

19
17
69
3

4
12
10
5

1.6
2.0
5.4
0.5

20
29
9
113 205 318
13
18
5
156 144 300

Somatic Diseases
Manic Depressive
Involution Melancholl
•.holla
Dementia Praeoox

>ld conlit ions
Epileptic psychoses
ies
Psyohoneuroses
With Psychopat : Personal-

ity
With Mental Deficiency
jienoy
Dridlagnosed Psychoses
loses
Without Psychosesi

Totals

23
29
79
8

8.4

2.0

81.7

Kalamazoo
M
P

Pontiac
M
F

Traverse
'Psycho- Eloise
City
Newberry Ionia Ypsilantl pathio
M
F M F M F M
F H F M F

3

.

6
23
3
4
5
1
1
18

7
10

2
1
7

1
3

2

1

1
6

1.8

i

80.6

45

31
3
31

1
1

1
20

1
87

8

10

1
4
12
1
4
4
2
22
S
34

27
14
37

19
8
62

46
22
99

3.1
1.5
6.7

6
2
7

1
3
15

1
1
7

1
2
9

4
7
5

15
27
57
68

12
27
36
63
57 114
41 109

1.8
4.3
7.8
7.6

3
7
11
14

2
5
8
11

1
4
2
6

2
6
7
6

6
6
12
13

160

128

68

78

139

753

712 1466

100.00

2
6
1
4

2
2
2

2
1

1
6

1
1

1

1 1
84 10
6
32 13
3
3
6

1
6

1
11
3
11 5
6 16
117

68

3
4
22

1

3
6
20
1

2
25

3
83

11

24

1

4

' 4
1

1

1

8
6
68

3
2
9

1
1

3
1
16
10
1 150

7

4

1

2

10

4

20
9
1

1

1 28

3
S

1

6
50
2
29

1
5
1
9

4

5

2

6
2
6

1

6

81
5
11

1

'•.;.

16
5
178 24

15
1
23

2
1
7
1
2
4
2
8
43
26

7
1

5

3

1

1
6
10
9

1
2
7
7

24 140 118

Part II
HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS

This portion of the report covers information relating to the inmates of the two schools located in the state for the care and training
of mental defectives. As previously mentioned in this report, the Michigan School is located at Lapeer, with a branch of this school which was
opened in 1934 at Mt. Pleasant. The county of Wayne maintains a similar
school at Northville, and the greater portion of its population are state
wards for whose maintenance the county is reimbursed by the state.
The tables which follow cover the population of both these institutions and give a complete picture of the group of mental defectives
which has been institutionalized for care and training over recent years.

1 -

POPULATION OP TRAIHIHG SCHOOLS

In this table is given the total actual resident population for
each of the twenty-one years from 1915 to 1935 inclusive, as shown on
June 30th of each year. These figures are divided as between male and
female and are further compared with the actual state population in the
last three columns. This number in residence, of course, does not include any individuals on parole or visit who are still included on the
books of the institution. At this season of the year (June 30th) this
number absent from the institution is comparatively large, due to the
number allowed to go home during this vacation period.
As regards the number of male and female residents, it will be
noted that in all the twenty year period males have exceeded females in
actual count, except in the year 1933.
Considered in proportion to the
male and female population of the entire state, females in the schools
have shown the higher ratio in the last five years and in over half of
the preceding years.
While the entire state population has shown a 58 per cent Increase over that of 1915, the resident population of these training
schools has increased 286 per cent over the figures of twenty years ago.

TOTAL RESIDENT POPULATION 20 TEAR PERIOD 1915 - 1935

Table I

Resident Population
Male
Female
Total

Population of Michigan
Male
Female

Total

Number of Patients per
100,000 population
Male
Female
Total

715
784

540
603
710
718

1163
1252
1426
1508

1,694,450
1,744,850
1,785,300
1,829,560

1,544,843
1,580,266
1,625,640
1,667,204

3,239,293
3,325,116
3,410,940
3,496,764

36.8
37.2
40.1
42.9

34.9
38.1
43.6
43.1

35.9
37.4
41.7
43.2

1919
1920
1921
1922

803
807
842
845

713
765
792
778

1516
1562
1634
1623

1,879,240
1,928,436
1,990,600
2,059,500

1,703,348
1,739,976
1,795,199
1,844,286

3,582,588
3,668,412
3,785,799
3,903,186

42.7
41.8
42.3
41.1

47.9
44.1
44.2
42.2

42.3
42.6
43.2
41.6

1923
1924
1925
1926

1151
1147
1330
1361

1038
1095
1162
1224

2189
2242
2492
S585

2,118,600
2,175,200
2,241,550
2,309,600

1,901,973
1,962,760
2,013,797
2,063,134

4,020,573
4,137,960
4,255,347
4,372,734

54.5
52.8
59.3
58.9

54.4
55.8
57.7
59.3

54.4
54.3
58.5
59.2

1927
1928
1929
1930

1519
1681
1774
1908

1321
1435
1560
1602

2840
3116
3334
3510

2,361,804
2,428,157
2,494,745
2,519,309

2,128,317
2,179,351
2,230,150
2,323,016

4,490,121
4,607,508
4,784,895
4,842,325

64.3
69.2
71.2
75.7

62.2
65.9
69.8
69.1

63.2
67.5
70.6
72.6

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

1992
2048
2073
2170
2322

2006
2011
2161
2100
2164

3998
4060
4234
4270
4486

2,608,499
2,713,394
2,667,747
2,694,197
8,717,480

2,322,501
2,415,516
2,375,253
2,398,803
2,420,520

4,931,000
5,128,910
5,043,000
5,093,000
5,138,000

76.3
75.4
77.6
81.2
84.5

86.2
83.3
91.1
87.7
88.4

81.0
79.2
83.9
84.1
86.2

1915
1916
1917
1918

623
649

o

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j here shown for each calendar 3

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

TOTAL DEATHS DURING 20 YEAR PERIOD

The total deaths occurring in the training schools each calendar year from 1915 to 1954 are shown in this table. The total under
treatment each year is made up of the total resident population at
the "beginning of each year plus the total admissions during the year.
The ratio of deaths to each 1000 under treatment, as shown in
the fourth column, indicates a generally decreasing death rate, with
the last year in agreement with the country's average death rate in
civil life.
Table III

TOTAL DEATHS DURING 20 YEAR PERIOD - 1915 - 1934

Year

Total Deaths

Total Under
Treatment

Deaths per 1000
Under Treatment

1915
1916
1917
1918

55
117
122
58

1434
1668
1767
1789

38.3
69.8
69.2
32.4

1919
1920
1921
1922

53
67
42
57

1868
1945
1884
2356

28.4
34.5
22.3
24.2

1923
1924
1925
1926

87
47
57
70

2675
2696
2973
3119

32,
17,
19,
21.9

1927
1928
1929
1930

54
52
82
53

3667
3843
4130
4279

14.8
13.6
19.8
12.4

1931
1932
1933
1934

59
75
65
65

4576
4902
5028
5707

12.9
15.2
12.9
11.3

HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS

INCREASES IN POPULATION AND CAPACITIES OVER 20 TEARS

In the table which follows is shown the yearly increase, from
1915 to 1935, of the population and capacity of the state training
schools.
A review of the record of building construction shows what
buildings were completed each fiscal year, while the amount of these
capital expenditures is given in table II-S of this report. In the
year ending June 30, 1917 at the Home and Training School at Lapeer
colony building #2 and cottage #29 were completed, adding 107 beds to
the total capacity. In 1918 colony building #3 was added with 66 bed
capacity and in 1919 colony building #4 and building #5 were completed
with a capacity of 66 beds apiece. In 1923 the institution capacity
was increased by 459 beds when colony buildings #6, #7, #9, #10 and
#12 were opened with a capacity of 67 beds each. In 1924 the two
colony buildings #8 and #11 contributed & total of 134 beds on completion. In 1925 465 beds were added to the capacity of the Lapeer
school by opening colony buildings #13, #14 and #15, cottage #35 and
the girls hospital which latter building has a capacity of 202 beds.
In 1927 colony building #17 supplied 13 more beds and in 1930, the completion of colony building #16 with 12 more beds, cottages #33 and
#34 with 139 beds each and cottage #35 with 90 beds added a total of
368 beds to the Lapeer school for that year. Cottage #36, opened in
1933, was the last building erected at Lapeer to date, adding 24 beds
to make the present total capacity of 2795 beds. During the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1934 the arrangements were completed for transfer
of the Federal school property at Mt. Pleasant to this state and 110
beds were added to the total state capacity by rebuilding cottage B
at the Mt. Pleasant branch school.
An additional factor which has increased the total state capacity for care and training of mental defectives is the erection of a
new training school by Wayne County, located at Northville. This institution was opened in the fall of 1926 with about 150 beds, added
to its capacity each year until 1931, when it reached its present
maximum of 750 beds.

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

IV - POPULATION AND CAPACITY INCREASES

The increases in population and capacities are shown for each
fiscal year in this table from 1915 to 1935 for the Home and Training
schools in the state. In the third column is given the percentages
of increase each year in the populations of these institutions over
that of 1915.
In the fifth column is given the percentage of increase
yearly over that of 1915 in the capacities of state institutions. Up
to 1927 capacity increases are shown to have kept pace with population
increases, but in the years following state capacities have fallen
far behind. In the sixth column is figuring the per cent of excess
population over state capacity, the total of state wards being housed
by Wayne County from 1927 on, are included in the calculations as
though housed in state institutions. Allowance has also been made
In this connection for the number of inmates at home on school vacation at this time of the year (June 30) for whom dormitory space has
to be reserved.
In the last column is shown the effect that Wayne County School
at Northville has in reducing this excess over capacity by caring for
several hundred state wards In addition to those being maintained
there at county expense.
Recent developments, not Included within the period covered
by the following table, will aid materially in Increasing the state
capacities of these schools. The opening of the rebuilt Cottage C
at the Mt. Pleasant branch school in July, 1935 adds capacity for 193
beds. The recent legislative act, creating the Childrens' Village at
the former Coldwater School, is being put into effect and will, in due
time, result in an increase of about 350 more beds for this training
school group.

POPULATION AND CAPACITY CHARTS

The chart on page eight shows graphically the totals for population and capacity each year from 1915 to date for the Home and
Training Schools in the state, as given each year on June 30th.
On page nine are graphs showing the percentage relation between the yearly increases in population and capacity of the training
schools in the state since 1915, and the corresponding increases in
the state's population. These show how much more the schools' population and capacity have increased as compared with that of the state
population.

POPULATION AND CAPACITY INCREASES

Table IV
Tear
Ending
June 30

Resident
population

Increase In
Population

State
School
Capacities

Increase In Per Cent of
Excess Over
Capacities
State Capacity

Wayne
County
Capacity

Per Cent of
excess over
capacity including Wayne
County

1015
1071
1122
1188

5.5
10.5
16.0

20.6
22.8
33.3
34.0

20.6
22.8
33.3
34.0

30.3
34.4
40.4
39.6

1320
1320
1320

30.8
30.8
30.8
30.8

21.7
24.2
30.0
29.0

21.7
24.2
30.0
29.0

2189
2242
2492
2585

88.2
92.6
114.2
122.3

1779
1913

75.2
88.5
129.6
129.6

29.2
23.0
12.2
16.3

29.2
23.0
12.2
16.3

1927
1928
1929
1930

2840
3116
3334
3510

143.9
168.1
186.5
201.5

2346
2346
2358

131.2
131.2
131.2
132.3

22.9
33.0
41.8
49.8

300
500
600
650

12.7
14.9
18.8
22.5

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

3998
4060
4234

243.4
248.6
263.8
268.5

2726
2726
2750
2860
2860

168.5
168.5
171.0
181.6
181.6

48.8
51.2
54.6
49.7
59.6

750
750
750
750
750

20.7
22.6
27.0
24.2
30.3

1915
1916
1917
1918

1163
1252
1425
1502

7.6
22. 6
29.1

1919
1920
1921
1922

1516
1562
1634
1623

1923
1924
1925
1926

4270
4486

286.2

1320

2333
2333

2346

5

a
53
H3

a

53
a
95

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

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MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

V - MOVEMENT OP POPTJLATION

This table gives in detail the changes in population at Lapeer
and Northville for the years 1933 and 1934.
Here are shown the number of admissions, readmissions, transfers, discharges and deaths occurring in each of these institutions
during the above years.
The number away from the institutions but still on the books
at the close of the year is relatively high due to that being a vacation period.

VI - ENROLLMENT BY AGE GROUPS AND MENTAL CLASSIFICATION

In this table is included the enrollment of the two schools at
Lapeer and Northville, covering those in residence as well as those
on vacation and parole on December 31, 1934.
This tabulation shows that three quarters of the enrollment la
contained in the age group from five to nineteen years. The age
group including 10 to 14 years contains the largest number in any
single group. One third of the enrollment is contained in each of
the imbecile and moron groups. Females show a considerably higher
proportion of idiots, imbeciles and morons than do the males.
The ages making up the above groups are in accordance with
the date given above.

10

MOVEMENT OP POPULATIOH 1933-1934

Patients on books January 1. 1953
In Institution
On Vacation or Parole
Admitted During Period
First Admissions 1933
First Admissions 1934
Readmlssions 1933
Readmlssions 1934
Transfers from other Institutions 1933
of same kind 1934
Total Admitted
Total under treatment during period
Discharged During Year
Discharged 1933
Discharged 1934
Died 1933
Died 1934
Transfers to other institutions of 1933
same kind 1934
Total reductions during period
Total on books December 51, 1934
In Institution
On Vacation and Parole

Michigan Home
and Training
School
M
F
1841
2025
1614
1766
230
263

All Training Schools
F
T
M
4777
2381
2396
2033
4083
2060
352
701
349

3
753

225
204
13
15
8
2
467

470
676
22
39
8
6
1220

3149

2848

141
195
39
34
22
8
439
2710
2296
414

142
162
31
34
27
5
401
2447
2071
376

245
472
9
24

106
355
9
24

Wayne County
Training School
M
P
555
356
436
267
119
89
139
117

54
64

3
497

171
140
13
15
8
2
349

256

118

5997

2338

2374

811

474

283
357
70
68
49
13
840
5157
4366
798

50
68
36
32
22
8
206
2132
1862
270

81
82
31
34
20
5
253
2121
1825
296

91
137
3
2

61
80

r

r—f

7
233
578
434
144

148
326
246
80

a
o
3
55
a

M'
§

a
o
o

Table VI

CHRONOLOGICAL AGE AND MENTAL CLASSIFICATION DECEMBER 31, 1934
Male Enrollment

Moron
Imbecile
Idiot
Borderline • Dull Normal
Normal
I.Q. 0-24 I.Q. 25-49 ' I.Q. 50-69 I.Q. 70-79 I.Q. 80-89 I.Q. 90-up Undetermined

Age
0 - 4 yrs.
5-9
10 - 14
15 - 19

33
179
136
57

31
211
249
178
64
28
7
15

20
129
•:

336

.;.

276

4
23
127
82

1
7
22
15

2
1
2

14

3
1

2

Total

Percentage

12
42
49
69

103
592
921
677

3.79
21.77
34.24
24.90

17
11
8
1

218
74
. 25
28

8.02
2.72
.91
1.02

5
2
1
2

24
10
9
5

.88
.36
.33
.18

1 .
5

2
22

.81

225
8.30

2710

Q
t>

a:

20
25
30
35

-

24
29
34
39

31
15
7
6

40
45
50
55

-

44
49
54
59

5
2
1
1

60 & up
Unknown

4

Total

Per Cent

477
17.60

87
19
2
5

13
5
5
1 -../..

7

• , "'

814
30.04

1
1

1
1
2
1
1
2

3

882
32.56

255
9.40

1
50
1.84

7
0.26

.07

100.00

H
o
Ul

Table VI continued

CHRONOLOGICAL AGE AND MENTAL CLASSIFICATION DECEMBER 31, 1934
Female Enrollment

Normal
Moron
Imbecile
Borderline Dull Normal
Idiot
I.Q. 80-89 I.Q. 90-up Undetermined
I. ft. 0-24 I.Q. 25-49 I.Q. 50-69 I.Q. 70-79

Age
0 - 4 yra.
5-9
10 - 14
15 - 19

241
276

2
25
62
71

2
6
10
11

87
40
34
32

108
38
20
19

17
2
2
1

4

18
7
4
5

8
2
1

7

3

817
33.39

808
33.03

43
161
120
64

27
148
235
173

35 - 39

34
21
18
9

40 - 44
45 - 49

3
7

15

77

3
3
1

Total

Percentages

7
22
21
24

99
439
692
620

4.04
17.95

5
12
5
4

255

28.29
25.35

W
o
g

H
>

a
1-3

S

20 - 24
25 - 29
30-34

50-54
55 - 59
Unknown
Total
Per Cent



5

485
19.83

79
65

10.43
4.62
3.22
2.65

1

31
19
5
6

1.26
.77
.20
.24

8

24

.98

2
3

1

184
7.52

34
1.38

7
.28

112
4.57

113

2447
100.00

Ed

2J

h-l

Q
50
O
HH

O
32

Table VI eont- TOTAL ENROLLMENT BT CHRONOLOGICAL AGE AND MENTAL CLASSIFICATION DECEMBER 31, 1934

Imbecile
I.Q. 25-49

Moron
I.Q. 50-69

Borderline
I.Q. 70-79

76
340
256
121

58
359
484
351

35
206
577
552

6
48
189
153

3
13
32

195
57
22
24

31
2
3
2

7
1

9
3
3
1

2

Idiot
I.Q. 0-24

0-4
5-9
10 - 14
15 - 19
20
25
30
35

-

24
29
34
39

65
36
25
15

151
68
41
47

40
45
50
55

-

44
49
54
59

8
9
1
1

31
12
9
6

60 & up
Unknown

9

14

Total
Per Cent

Normal
Dull Normal
I.Q. 80-89 I.Q. 90-up

26

5
1
5
1
g

962
18.65

1631
31,63

1690
32.79

3

2

0

439

84

14

8.51

1.62

19
64
70

.27

Total

Per Cent

202
1031
1613
1297

3.92
20.00
31.31
25.14

5

473
187
104
93

9.16
3.63
2.01
1.80

5
5
1
3

55
29
14
11

1.07
.56
.27
.21

1
13

2
46

.04
.88

93
22
23
13

1
6

Undetermined

337
6.53

'

5157

100.00

S
%

5
S
GO
>

a
p
££
1^
t-1
X

Table VII - NATIVITY AND PAREUTAQE BY MENTAL GROUPS - TOTAL ENROLLMENT DECEMBER 31, 1934
Mental
Groups

Native
M
F

Native Born Divided as to Parent age
Mixed
Unknown
F
11
F
F
M

Foreign
M

M

Total
F

T

M

938

10

Aggregate
F

Foreign Born
F
T

11

14

24

477

485

T

Idiot
I.Q. 0-24

236

813

116

138

61

62

64

58

467

471

Imbecile
I.Q. 25-49

361

342

166

184

80

93

172

168

769

787

1556

45

30

75

814

817

1631

Moron
I.Q. 50-69

354

350

125

182

77

75

296

217

854

764

1618

28

44

72

882

808

1690

Borderline
I.Q. 70-79

91

78

36

82

29

17

87

61

244

179

423

11

5

16

255

184

439

Dull Normal
I.Q. 80-89

23

16

7

5

3

3

13

8

46

31

77

4

3

7

50

34

84

s
t^

Normal
I.Q. 90 & up
Unknown

962

5
>
y
^
i-S
X
>

3
&;

0
5

2

1

0

1

2

0

3

7

7

14

0

0

0

7

7

14

so
o

135

68

39

33

32

8

11

11

217

110

327

8

2

10

225

112

337

o
h-t

Totals 1205

1068

480

604

283

260

633

526

2604

2349

4953

106

98

804

2710

2447

5157

The total enrollment of both, schools as of December 31, 1934 Is here divided as to native and foreign
born, with a further separation Into mental classifications based on Individual I.Q's.
Only a little over four per cent of the total are foreign born, with the division Into mental classifications for the foreign born showing about half the percentage of Idiots that the native born do. Of the native
born, those of foreign parentage indicate a proportion of Idiots about five per cent greater than do the ones
of native parentage.

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

VIII - TOTAL ENROLLMENT BY COUNTRIES OP BIRTH OR EXTRACTION

In this table the enrollment of the schools at Lapeer and
Northville, as of December 31, 1934, is divided according to the
birth or parentage of each individual. Those born in the United
States, whose parents are likewise born in this country, are listed
under this head. Those born in the United States, with both parents
born in another country, are listed under the head of such country.
Those having parents born in separate countries are listed under the
country of birth of the male parent.
The third column lists the number of Inhabitants in the state,
divided as above, according to the 1930 census.
In the last column the number of enrolled cases thus related
to each country is shown in proportion to each 100,000 persons of that
same country included in the state population.
Austria, which shows an actual enrollment of 59 patients, has
the highest number in proportion to the related total in the state's
population, while Scotland is among the lowest.

16

HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS

Table VIII
TOTAL ENROLLMENT - DEC. 31, 1934 DIVIDED BY. COUNTRIES OP PARENTAGE

Total Enrolled

Total in State

Per 100,000
Sen. Pop.

59
16
3
476

34,792
26,818
2,273
499,002

169.8
59.6
132.0
95.3

26
9
87
38

44,602
20,507
166,848
74,229

58.2
44.0
52,5
51.2

France
Germany
Greece
Holland

12
213
15
43

18,085
365,263
16,175
106,426

66.3
58.2
92.6
40.3

Hungary
Ireland
Italy
Jugoslavia

44
35
109
11

40,434
83,702
98,048
33,492

108.7
41.8
111.2
33.0

Lithuania
Korway
Poland
Roumania

6
8
307
11

20,489
23,117
320,634
20,381

29.3
34.5
95.7
54.0

Russia
Scotland
Spain
Sweden

80
26
1
48

75,656
66,990
2,149
68,577

105.8
38.0
46.4
70.0

12
34
2252
2

11,066
23,196
2,556,192
6,024

108.3
147.0
88.2
33.1

15

19,258

5157

4,842,325

Austria
Belgium
Bulgaria
Canada
Czechoslovakia
Denmark
England
Finland

Switzerland
Turkey
United States
Wales
Other Countries*
Unknown
Total Enrollment

77.9

106.3

•Includes Africa, Australia, Japan, Mexico and Other Countries

17

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

IX - PRESENT ENROLLMENT DIVIDED BY COUNTIES OP RESIDENCE

The enrollment at the two schools on December 31, 1934 is
here divided according to the counties of the state from which the
patients were received. The population of each county by the IT. S.
census of 1930 is also given and the proportionate number enrolled
from each county per 100,000 population in each case is noted in
the last column.
Many of the counties in the poorer, thinly populated districts
show the highest rates, of which Kalkaska, Otsego and Osceola are
examples.

X - TOTAL ADMISSIONS BY COUNTIES

Total admissions to the two schools for the four year period
from 1931 to 1934 inclusive are included in this table, being divided according to the coxuities from which received.
The average number received annually from each county is compared with the population of that county by the 1930 census and the
corresponding number per 100,000 population noted in the last column.
A high proportionate rate of admission is apparent in some of
the upper counties, which, in some cases, likewise have a high enrollment rate shown in the previous table.

18

HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS

HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS - ANALYSIS OP PRESENT ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES
December 31, 1934
Per Each
Table IX
100,000
population
County
of counties
Counties
Male
Population
Female
Total
Alcona
Alger
Allegan
Alpena
Antrim
Arenac
Baraga
Barry

Bay

1
3
11
5
6
4
16
35
5

Benzie
Berrlen
35
Branch
11
Calhoun
38
Cass
10
Charlevolx
5
Cheboygan
11
Chlppewa
15
Clare
5
Clinton
17
Crawford
3
Delta
14
Dickinson
14
Eaton
20
Bnnnet
8
Genes ee
90
Gladwin
2
Gogebic
15
Gd. Traverse 15
Qratiot
14
Hllladale
25
Hought on
25
Huron
22
Ingham
49
Ionia
28
losco
5
Iron
11
Isabella
13
Jackson
67
Kalamazoo
36
Kalkaska
6
Kent
107
1
Keweenaw
Lake
Lapeer
30
Leelanau
1

1
4
12
9

6
8
3
9

40
4
23
17
23
17
7
6
32
3
11
2
18
11
13
10

2

7
23
14
12
12
3
25
75
9
58
28
61

27
12

17
47
8
28
5
32
25
33
18

67
6
4
11
10
15
24

157
8
19
26
24
40
49

16
52

38
101

16
1
9
18
55
48
9
98
1
7
22
4

44
6
20
31
122
84
15
205
2
7
52
5

19

4,989
9,327
38,974
18,574
9,979
8,007
9,168
20,928
69,474
6,587
81,066
23,950
87,043
20,888
11,981
11,502
25,047
7,032
24,174
3,097
32,280
29,941
31,778
15,109
211,641
7,424
31,577
20,011
30,252
27,417
52,851
31,132
116,587
35,093
7,517
20,805
21,126
92,304
91,368
3,799
240,511
5,076
4,066
28,348
8,206

40.
75.
59.

163.
121.
150.
33.

119.
108.
136.
72.

117.
70.
129.
101.
147.
187.
113.
116.
162.
99.
83.

104.
118.
74.

107.
60.

130.
79.

145.
92.
122.

86.
125.
80.

96.
147.
132.
92.
395.
85.
39.
172.
183.
61.

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS - ANALYSIS OF PRESENT ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES
Deoember 31, 1934
Table IX
Per Each
100,000
Continued:
population
County
Total
Female
Population
of counties
Male
Counties
Lenawee
18
Livingston
9
3
Luce
Maokinao
5
27
Macomb
Manistee
9
19
Marquette
4
Mason
Mecosta
7
11
Menominee
Midland
7
Missaukee
3
Monroe
15
Mont calm
20
Montmorency
5
Muskegon
38
Newaygo
5
Oakland
68
8
Oceana
4
Ogomaw
Ontonagon
6
Osceola
15
11
Ottawa
Oscoda
2
Ota ego
Presque Isle
8
Ros common
1
Saginaw
51
St. Glair
50
St. Joseph
21
Sanilac
31
Schoolcraft
4
SMawassee
24
Tuscola
23
Van Buren
24
Washtenaw
38
Wayne
1246
Wexford
14
Non-Residents 2
Total

2710

22
13
9
7
25
8
15
5
8
13
9
5
11
17
1
33
5
101
5
7
3
20
13
2
10
6
2
47
52
19
28
1
22
15
12
29
1053

12
2447

40
22
12
12
52

17
34
9
15
24
16
8
26

37
6

71
10
169
13
11
9
35
24
2

12
14
3
101
102
40
59
5
46
38
36
67
2299

26
2
5157

20

49,849
19,274
6,528
8,783
77,146
17,409
44,076
18,576
15,738
23,652
19,150
6,992
52,485
27,471
2,814
84,930
17,029
211,251
13,805
6,595
11,114
12,806
54,858
1,728
5,554
11,330
2,055
120,717
67,563
30,618
27,751
8,451
39,517
32,934
32,637
65,530
1,888,946
16,827

4,842,325

80.
114.
183.
136.

67.
98.
77.
48.
95.
101.

83.
115.

49.
135.
213.

84.
59.
80.
94.
167.

81.
273.

43.
116.
216.
123.
145.

84.
151.
130.
213.

59.
116.
115.
111.
102.
121.
154.

106.3

HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS

Table X TOTAL ADMISSIONS DDHINQ 4 YEAR PERIOD - 1931-1934 BY COUNTIES
Male
Alcona
Alger
Allegan
Alpena
Antrim
Arenac
Baraga
Barry
Bay
Benzie
Berrlen
Branch
Calhoua
Cass
Charlevoix
Cheboygan
Chlppewa
Clare
Clinton

Crawford
Delta
Dickinson
Eaton
Emmet
Qeneaee
Bladwin
Hogeblo

Gki. Traverse
Sratiot
Hlllsdale
Eoughton
Huron
Ingham

Ionia
losoo
Iron
Isabella
Jackson
Ealamazoo
Kalkaska
Kent
Keweenaw

1
3
1
1
4
11
13
3
13

2
4
5
1
10
2

4
8
2
34
1
3
4
3
6
6
8
30
10
2
1
6
23
17
28
1

Female

Total

Average
Each Year

Per 100,000
Population

1
4
6
6
4
4
1
4
18

1
5
9
7
4
4
2
8
29

.25
1.25
2.25
1.75
1.00
1.00
.05
2.00
7.25

5.0
13.5
5.8
9.5
10.0
12.5
5.5
9.5
10.5

12
8
11
4
1
4
12
1
4
2
16
2
5
5
43
4
2
5
5
6
8
5
41
13

25
11
24
4
3
8
17
2
14
4
20
2
13
7
77
5
5
9
8
12
14
13
71
23
2
3
14
42
36
3
63
1

6.25
2.75
6.00
1.00
.75
2.00
4.25
.50
3.50
1.00
5.00
.50
3.25
1.75
19.25
1.26
1.25
2.25
2.00
3.00
3.50
3.25
17.75
5.75
.50
.75
3.50
10.50
9.00
.75
15.75
.25

7.7
11.5
7.0
4.8
6.2
17.5
17.0
7.1
14.5
32.5
15.5
1.7
10.2
11.5
9.1
16.8
4.0
11.2
6.6
11.0
6.6
10.5
15.0
16.4
6.7
3,6
16.6
11.5
9.8
19.8
6.5
4.9

2
8
19
19
3
35

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

Table X
continued:
Male
Lake
Lapeer
Leelanau
Lenawee
Livingston
Luce
Mackinac
Macomb
Manistee
Marquett-e
Mason
Mecosta
Menominee
Midland
Missaukee
Monroe
Mont calm
Montmorency
Muskegon
Newaygo
Oakland
Oceana
Ogemaw
Ontonagon
Osceola
Ottawa
Oscoda
Otsego
Presque Isle
Ros common
Saginaw
St. Clair
St. Joseph
Sanilac
Schoolcraft
Shiawassee
Tuscola
Van Bur en
Washtenaw
Wayne
Wezford
Non-residents
Total

Femal e

Total

Average
Each Year

Per 100,000
Population

4
11
1

1.00
2.75

24.5

.25

1
10
4
6

8
6
4
3
13
2
6

15
10
4
4
23
6
12

3.75
2.50
1.00
1.00
5.75
1.50
3.00

3.0
7.5

2

1

8
4
2
12

7
10
2
10

9

5

3
15
14
4
22
14
2
31
1

5
1
7
4

4
6

2

19
36

3
3
1
5
1

12
1
51
6
1

8
6
2
6
3

15
15
5
12

21
27
5
14

11
7
6
15
707
1

10
4
5
11
690
5

1212

1328

7.5
8.6
6.8

.75

4.7

3.75
2.50
1.00
5.50
3.50

15.8
13.0
14.3
10.5
12.7
17.5

.50

7.75

9.2

1.4

87
6
1

21.75
1.50

10.3
10.8

.25

3.8

11
9
2
7
8
1
36
42
10
26

2.75
2.25

26

1397
6
2

2540

22

13.0
15.3
11.4

.25

21
11
11

2

9.7

.50

1.75
2.00
.25

9.00
10.50
2.50
6.50
5.25
2.75
2.75
6.50
349.25
1.50

21.5
4.1

28.'9
31.5
17.5
12.2
7.5
15.5
8.2
23.5
13.3
8.3
8.4

9.9
18.5

8.9

.50
635.00

13.1

TOTAL ADMISSIONS - MENTAL STATUS RELATED TO RESIDENCE AND ECONOMIC CONDITIONS
In this table is shown the total admissions to the two training schools for the four years from 1931 to
1934, divided according to their mental classification, the type of residence, whether rural or urban, and
their condition in life economically. About 80 per cent of the admissions are from urban localities and fully
one half of those from both rural and urban sections are dependent. As to mental status, slightly more than
one third from urban sections are idiots or imbeciles, while about half of the rural admissions are made up of
those belonging in either of these two groups.
TOTAL ADMISSIONS DURING 4 YEAR PERIOD 1931-1934
MENTAL STATUS WITH RELATION TO RESIDENCE AND ECONOMIC CONDITION

Table XI

Marginal
M
F

Idiot
Imbecile

38
29

40
54

Moron
Borderline

39
14

65
13

26
5

55
10

Dull Normal
Normal

2

Unknown

9

4
1
11

2
1
16

Total

114

144

117

Independent
M
P
2

4

11

172

Unknown
M
F
2

1
1

2

1

53

O

Urban

Rural
Dependent
M
P
15
14
33
36

a
o

Dependent
M
P

Marginal
M
F

Independent
M
P

8 7

53
105

59
82

76
115

1 228
1
85

229
74

144
62

160
27

9
1

18
6

22

15
4
23

14
2
46

8
2
23

473

503

409

411

2 7

12
10

14
24

Unknown
M
P
1

1

4

9
1

35
16

17
13

1

S

1

Z

1

6

34

56

54

37

CO

o
I-H

O

S
02

RATIO OF DEATHS TO EACH 1000 UNDER TREATMENT

Table XII

The total deaths occurring from 1931 to 1934 inclusive are here divided according to mental status.
The average number dying annually in each group is shown in the second column and the average number under
treatment, determined as noted in the preceding table, is given in the third column. The ratio of these
average deaths to the number under treatment is shown in the last column and indicates a relatively high rate
for those of the lowest mental status.
DEATHS PER 1000 UNDER TREATMENT
1931 - 1934

Table Xll-a

Total Deaths

Average Deaths
annually

Under Treatment

Deaths Per
1000 Under
treatment

s

. O

w

h-1

Q
GO

103

25.7

1000

85.7

Imbecile

66

16.5

1677

9.8

Moron

55

13.7

1840

7.4

Idiot

Borderline

4

Dull Normal

1

Normal

1
34

Unknown

Total

k

264

1.0

455

2.1

.26

101

2.4

.25

21

11.8

346

24.6

5440

12.1

8.5
66.0

S
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MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

XIII
DISCHARGES IN RELATION TO MENTAL STATUS AND LENGTH OP RESIDENCE

The total discharges from the two schools, which have been made
during the four year period from 1931 to 1934 inclusive, are given in
this table and are divided by mental status. These are in addition to
transfers which may have been made between the two schools in the state,
and also to deaths which are given in a separate table. The length of
residence in the institution of those discharged averages about five
years and is greatest with those of the lower mental status.

XIV - DEATHS IN RELATION TO MENTAL STATUS AND LENGTH OF RESIDENCE

The total deaths for the four year period of 1931 to 1934 are
shown in this table, divided by mental status and giving average length
of residence. This time of residence includes the total elapsed time
in the interval between the date of admission and the date of death.
Those of the lower mental status show the longest periods of residence.

XV - CAUSES OP DEATH

The causes for the total deaths occurring in the schools from
1931 to 1934 inclusive are here listed in accordance with the International List, published by the Bureau of the Census. Over 45 per
cent of these deaths were from tuberculosis and pneumonia. Among the
idiots over 50 per cent of the deaths were from the same causes.

26

HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS

Table XIII
TOTAL DISCHARGES BY MENTAL STATUS AND AVERAGE LENGTH OF RESIDENCE
1931 - 1934

Average Length of Residence
Male
Female
Total
Mental Status
Total
M
F
Yrs
Yrs.
Mos
Mos . Yrs.
Mos

47

17

30

4

1

8

6

6

4

Imbecile

118

42

76

7

10

5

2

6

1

Moron

541

281 260

5

1

4

5

4

9

Borderline

203

116

87

5

3

4

10

5

0

Dull Normal

66

38

28

4

8

4

3

4

5

Normal

26

14

12

3

9

5

7

4

7

unknown

30

13

17

4

1

8

6

6

7

521 510

5

2

5

0

5

1

Idiot

Total

1031

Table XIV
TOTAL DEATHS BY MENTAL STATUS AND AVERAGE LENGTH OP RESIDENCE
1931 - 1934

Mental Status

Total

Average Length, of Residence
Female
Total
Male
Yrs.
Mos
Yrs .
Mos
Mos. Yrs.

M

F

103

53

50

7

7

6

0

6

9

Imbecile

66

32

34

13

6

7

10

10

5

Moron

55

21

34

4

0

7

9

5

10

Borderline

4

2

2

6

10

2

7

4

8

Dull Normal

1

1

4

5

4

5

Normal

1

1

34

21

Idiot

Unknown
Total

264

4

4
13

7

4

5

9

6

1

131 133

8

4

6

10

7

10

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

Table XT

CAUSES OP DEATH - 4 YEAH PERIOD 1931-1934
Idiots
M
F

Tuberculosis of resp. system
Tuberculosis of other organs
Other Infectious diseases
Cancers a n d other tumors
Other General Diseases
Diseases of blood and blood
making organs
Cerebral Hemorrhage
Epilepsy
Other diseases of nervous system
Endocarditis & Myocarditis
Other diseases o f heart
Other diseases of circulatory
Bronohopneumonia
Pneumonia

19
2
3

5

6

4

3

1

8

7
5

1
1
1
8

1
1
5
5
1

Total

7

1

Borderline
M
F

8

1

1

1
8

3

1

4
2
3

2
1
3

1
8
1

3
7

6
2

1
1

3

2

5
3
2

1

1
1

1
1

1
5

3

1

1

2

1
5

1
1

2

1

1

1
53

50

28

32

1

2

1

Congenital malformations
Disease o f early infancy
Suicide
Traumatism
Other accidental deaths
Unknown
All other causes

13
6
1
7
1
1 1

Morons
M
P

2

Other diseases o f resp. system
Diarahea
Appendicitis
Other diseases o f digestive sys.
Nephritis
Other diseases of genotourinary
Diseases of skin
Diseases of bones

Imbeciles
M
F

34

21

34

1

HOME AND TRAINING SCHOOLS

Table XV

CAUSES OP DEATH - 4 YEAR PERIOD 1931-1934

continued:

Dull
Normal
M
F

Tuberculosis of reap, system
Tuberculosis o f other organs
Other infectious diseases
Cancers a n d other tumors

Normal
M
F

Unknown
M
F

1

1
1

8
1

Other diseases o f resp. system
Dlarahea
Appendicitis
Other diseases o f digestive sys.

6

1
1

Nephritis
Other diseases of genotourinary
Diseases o f skin
Diseases of bones

3

2

1
12
1
9

1
13
2
7

2
25
3
16

2
2
20
16

2
22
15

4
2
42
31

2
1

2
1

4
2

3

5

8

1
5

9

3
11

1
1

1

5

1

29

21

7
2
1
3
20
1

2

7
1

1

T

2

5
2
2
1

1

Congenital malformations
Disease of early Infancy
Suicide
Trawmatism

Total

1
2

Other diseases o f heart
Other diseases of circulatory
Bronchopneumonia
Pneumonia

Total
F

27 29 56
2
1
3
6
8 14
4
4
8

1

Other general Diseases
Diseases of blood and blood
making organs
Cerebral Hemmorrhage
Epilepsy
Other diseases o f nervous system
Endocarditis & Myocarditis

Other accidental deaths
Unknown
All other causes

M

1

13 131 133 264

Part III
MICHIGAN EPILEPTIC COLONY

Care and treatment of epileptics within the state is provided
at the institution located at Wahjamega, a' few miles east of Saginaw,
near the village of Caro. This institution was first opened in 1914
and the tables which follow show its growth In capacity and population
from 1915 to date. They also include analysis of the present population and of admissions, discharges and deaths occurring during four
years, ending December 31, 1934.

1 - RESIDENT POPULATION 1915-1935

In this table is shown the resident population of the colony
as it stood on June 30th of each year from 1915 to date. The rated
capacity of the institution is also given and comparison with the
growth in population indicates that with a population increase of 538
per cent since 1915, the capacity increase has been considerably less
or 430 per cent in the same time.
The ratio of patients to the population of the state is given
in the last three columns. These show a definite increase in the
proportionate number of epileptics being given care and treatment by
the state with an almost equal proportion in the division between
males and females.

31

Table I
As Of
June 30

TOTAL RESIDENT POPULATION FOR 20 YEAR PERIOD 1915 - '1935

Capacity

Male

Resident Population
Female

Total

Number of Patients Per 100,000 Population
Male
Female
Total

4.9
4.9
10.1
10.5

1915
1916
1917
1918

132
256
284
378

152
163
233
246

0
0
114
121

152
163
347
367

8.9
9.3
13.0
13.4

7.0
7.2

1919
1920
1921
1922

428
428
478
514

243
271
308
324

211
220
215
340

454
491
523
664

12.9
14.0
15.4
15.6

11.8
12.6
12.0
18.4

12.6
13.3

1923
1924
1925
1926

514
514
608
584

312
366
372
441

333
340
349
403

645
706
721
844

14.7
16.8
16.5
19.0

17.5
17.3
17.3
19.4

16.1
17.1
16.9
19.3

1927
1928
1929
1930

584
584
584
584

441
421
395
406

409
399
383
376

850
820
778
782

18.6
17.3
15.8
16.1

19.2
18.3
17.1
16.1

18.9
17.8
16.5
16.1

1931
1932
1933
1934
1935

584
699
699
699
699

413
418
484
519
508

395
403
448
461
463

808
821
932
980
971

16.4
15.4
18.1
19.3
18.5

16.9
16.7
18.8
19.2
18.8

16.3
16.0
18.5
19.2
18.7

13.8
16.6

g

o
W
h-f

Q
50
^
ft

a
o
CO
2

1

STATE EPILEPTIC COLONY

CAPACITIES AND BUILDINGS

Table II

Tear

Capacity
beginning
year

Capacity
added beds

Buildings
Cottages 1 & 2
Cottages 3 & 4
Cottage 5

Capacity Per Cent Of
end of
Population
year
over capacity
432
18.8
256
19.5
284
25.7

1915
1916
1917

24
132
256

108
124
28

1918
1919
1920

284
378
428

94
50
0

Cottage 6
Cottage 7

378
428
428

10.2
18.4

1921
1922
1923

428
478
514

50
36
0

Cottage 8
Addition to #7

478
514
514

24.0
27.4
31.0

1924
1925

514
514

0
94

514

38.7

1926

608

0

608
584

29.4
44.5

1927
1928
1929

584
584
584

0
0
0

584
584
584

42.8
36.9
33.5

1930
1931
1932

584
584
584

0
0
115

584
584
699

36.2
39.3
25.3

1933
1934
1935

699
699
0

0
0
0

699
699
0

36.2
38.2

#8 Addition
Cottage #9
Cottage A burned

Hospital

33

8.4

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

II - CAPACITIES AND BUILDINGS

The additions to the capacity of the colony which have "been
made from 1915 to date by the erection of new cottages and a hospital
building are included in this table. The amount of investment represented by these added buildings over this period is given in the
table II-c of this report covering expenditures.
The capacities as given are based on a unit figure of 750 cubic
feet of air space per patient. The type of construction of these
colony buildings provides large open dormitories with a maximum of
air circulation and separate day rooms in connection.
The last column of this table shows the proportion of overcrowding as indicated by the population at the close of each year
and based on the capacity ratings as noted.

Ill - ADMISSIONS AND DEATHS 1915-1934

The total admissions and the total deaths occurring each year
from 1915 to 1934 are included in this table. The rate of these admissions in proportion to each 100,000 of the state's population for
each successive year shows a varying ratio due to the additional
buildings erected.
Deaths are shown in relation to each 1000 patients under treatment. This number under treatment includes the total patients in
residence at the beginning of the year plus all admissions during the
twelve months following.

TOTAL ADMISSIONS AND DEATHS 1915 to 1934 INCLUSIVE

Table III

Calendar Year

Total
Admissions

Admissions Per
100,000 Population

Total
Deaths

Total Under
Treatment

Deaths Per 1000
Under Treatment

1915
1916
1917
1918

157
157
145
187

4.8
4.7
4.2
5.3

8
13
59
78

181
318
440
544

44.3
41.0
134.0
143.5

1919
1920
1921
1922

171
99
207
67

4.8
2.7
5.5
1.7

68
69
41
29

620
606
711
706

110.0
113.5
67.5
41.2

1923
1924
1925
1926

89
128
126
173

2.2
3.1
2.9
3.9

53
56
49
62

747
788
832
912

71.0
71.0
58.9
68.0

1927
1928
1929
1930

99
36
59
95

2.2
0.8
1.2
1.9

59
69
68
54

928
875
838
867

63.5
78.8
81.2
62.3

1931
1932
1933
1934

106
141
151
178

2.1
2.7
2.9
3.5

74
65
86
118

899
1008
1112
1133

82.3
65.5
77.2
104.0

nits
IS
"a
HH
P

IS

O

o

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

Table IV

POPULATION MOVEMENT 1933 and 1934

The movement and changes in patients during the two years
ending December 31, 1934 are detailed in this table. These admissions, discharges and deaths are made up from individual reports by
the institution covering each case.
The 42 cases received by transfer in 1933 were from the Home
and Training School at Lapeer. There are more male admissions during the period and similarly more male discharges and deaths, so
that the ratio of male and female population remains about the same.
POPULATION MOVEMENT - 1933 and 1934
Male
Patients on books January 1, 1933
In Hospital
On Parole

506
464
42

Admitted During Period
First Admissions - 1933
84
First Admissions - 1934
107
Readmissions - 1933
4
Readmlssions - 1934
1
Transfers from other institutions of
same kind 1933 22
Transfers from other Institutions of
same kind 1934

Total Admitted
218
Total Under Treatment
724

Female

Total

467
445
22

973
909
64

62
69
1
1

146
176
5
2

20

42

153
620

371
1344

Diacharged - 1933
Discharged - 1934

11
31

6
15

17
46

Died - 1933
Died - 1934

41
83

47
34

88
117

Total Reductions

166

102

268

Patients on books December 31, 1934
In Hospital
On Parole

558
495
63

518
471
47

1076
966
110

Transfers to institutions - 1933
Transfers to institutions - 1934

STATE EPILEPTIC COLONY

V - TOTAL ADMISSIONS AND TOTAL POPULATION BY COUNTIES

In this table the total admissions from 19S1 to 1934 inclusive,
together with the total patient population on December 31, 1934, are
divided by counties from which received. The ratio of the total of
admissions for the four years and the patient population from each
county to each 100,000 actual population of each respective county by
the 1950 census is also tabulated.
Most of the counties having poor, sparsely settled districts
show the highest admission rate, as well as high patient population
rates. Examples are Arenao, losco, Kalkaska and Hontmorency.

VI- TOTAL ADMISSIONS BY AGE AND ECONOMIC STATUS

Here are divided the total admissions to the colony during the
four years ending December 31, 1934, by age groups and according to
the economic status of the patient or his family. Less than ten per
cent of those admitted were found to have resources sufficient to care
for immediate needs, while 43 per cent of them were actually dependent
upon charitable sources. Slightly less than half of those admitted
were under 20 years of age and 92 per cent of all admissions were
persons less than 50 years of age*

37

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

Table V
TOTAL ADMISSIONS 4 YEAR PERIOD 1931-1934 AND TOTAL BOOK POPULATION
Admissions
1931-1934

Number Of
Admissions
Per 100,000

Population
Dec. 31, 1934

Number Of
Patients Per
100,000

T
Aloona
Alger
Allegan
Alpena
Antrim
Arenac
Baraga
Barry

Bay

2
2
2
3
1
1
7

Benzie
Berrien
5
1
Branch
Calhoun
8
1
Cass
Charlevoix
Cheboygan
Chippewa
8
Clare
Clinton
1
Crawford
Delta
3
Dickinson
2
Eaton
2
1
Emmet
Genesee
24
Sladwin
Gogebic
Gd. Traverse
Gratiot
2
Hillsdale
1
Houghton
3
Huron
3
Ingham
4
4
Ionia
1
losco
Iron
Isabella
Jackson
2
Kalamazoo
9
1
Kalkaska
Kent
12
Keweenaw

4
1
2
5
1
4
1
2
1
1
2
2

14
1
2
2
1
1
2
7
3
1
3
2
1
10

2
6
2

21
15
11

4
1
3
12
1
9
2
10
1

50
11
14
17
15
11

1
8
1
3

9
32
14
12

5
2
S
1
38

15
7
6
7
18

1
2
4
2
4
5
11
4
4

3
10
13
7
8
16
9
11
53

1

5
11
2
22

2
2
5
6
4
3
3
12
2
9
3
13
2
1
2
8
1
1

8
11
5

4
2
5
3
31
2
3
2
6
2
10
6
12
5
2
3
6
13
1
18
1

5
5
12
53
9

38

2
8
4
2
3
1
10
1
6
4
12
2
2
2
3
4
4
4
2
3
22
1
3
4
5
6
2
3
13
3
3
3
5
11
7
1
31

4
2
13
10
2
7
3
4
22
3
15
7
25
4
3
4
8
4
5

80
21
33
54
20
88
33
19
32
46
18
29
29
19
25
35
32
43
21

8
6

25
20
22
40
25
40
19
30
36
29
23
29
21
23
40
24
38
18
22
53
20
20

7
6
53
3
6
6
11
8
12
9
25
8
3
5
8
17
20
2
49
1

STATE EPILKPTIC COLONY

Table V
continued:
Population

Dec . 31,
1934
Per 100,000

M
Lake
Lapeer
Leelanau
Lenawee
Livingston
Luce
Mackinac
10
Macomb
Manistee
Marquette
Mason
3
Mecosta
3
Menominee
2
Midland
Missaukee
5
Monroe
1
Montcalm
Montmorency
2
Muskegon
1
Newaygo
10
Oakland
2
Oceana
Ogemaw
1
Ontonagon
1
Osceola
3
Ot t awa
Oscoda
Otsego
Presque Isle
Roscommon
9
Saginaw
6
St. Clair
St. Joseph
2
5
Sanilac
Schoolcraft
1
Shiawassee
4
5
Tuscola
Van Buren
2
Washtenaw
5
Wayne
123
Wexford
2
Non-Residents
Total

339

1
4
1

1
6
1
9
2
1
2
10
1
5
4
4
3
4

25
21
12
18
10
15
23
13
6
11
21
25
13
21

15
1

6
2
1
3
1
25
3

11
7
35
3
6
12
22

1
3
3

2
4
6

18
31
11

4
1
19
3
1
1
1
5

19
12
3
9
1
8
9
4
6
203
2

16
18
10
32
12
20
27
12
9
11
12

1
2
1
15
13
2
5
2
8
7
4
8
165
4

576

12

558

1
1
1
1

10
6
1
4
4
4
2
1
80

237

8
5
3
1
11
1
8
1
6
8
2
7
3

F

Number of
Patients Per
100,000

T
1
9
2
12
7
4
3
16
3
14
6
8
10
5
1
12
8
1
10
1
43
5
2
1
3
9

25
32
24
24
36
60
34
21
17
32
32
51
42
26
14
23
29
35
11
6
20
36
30
9
23
16

12
16
4
7
1
9
4
6
5
157
2
1

2
3
1
27
29
6
12
3
17
11
10
13
322
6
1

36
26
48
22
43
19
43
36
43
33
31
20
17
36

518

1076

22

5
1
4
2
1
2
5
2
6
5
2
2
3
1
5
5
1
6
24
2
1
2
4
1
1

TOTAL ADMISSIONS 1931 - 1934 SHOWING AGE GROUP AND ECONOMIC STATUS

Table VI

0- 4
5- 9
10 - 14
15 - 19

Total Admissions

Dependent

Marginal

Comfortable

Unknown

23
49
96
118

11
16
38
47

11
28
46
58

1
4
10
8

1
2
5

20
25
30
35

-

24
29
34
39

84
66
26
25

42
26
15
14

35
30
10
5

2
7

40
45
50
55

-

44
49
54
59

20
24
17
6

10
12
6
3

9
10
10
3

1
1

13
4
3
2

5
3
1
1

8
2
1

576

249

266

60 - 64
65 - 67
70 and over

Unknown
Total

4

5
4
1
2
1
1

1

38

23

g

p-3
H

a
o
02

STATE EPILEPTIC COLONY

VII- ADMISSIONS BY AGE GROUPS AND NATIVITY

The total admissions occurring in the four year period from
1931 to 1954 are divided in this table according to nativity and age
groups. Less than seven per cent are foreign born, and of the native
born 55 per cent are of full native parentage.
The foreign born show a smaller proportion of females in the
total of their admissions. There are also a smaller number of the
younger age groups contained in the total of the foreign born admissions.

VIII - DISCHARGES AND YEARS OP HOSPITAL LIFE

The total discharges from 1951 to 1934 are shown here by age
groups and according to the number of years they have been on the
books of the institution. Seventy-eight per cent of all discharges
were less than 35 years old at the time of discharge. The same proportion as given above was true in the case of both sexes. The average time in the institution was also about the same for both sexes.

41

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MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

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Table VIII

Male

0-4
5-9
10 - 14
15 - 19
20 - 24
25 - 29
30 - 34
35 - 39
40 - 44
45 - 49
50 - 54

1
1

DISCHARGES DURING 4 YEAR PERIOD 1931 - 1934

Total Discharges
Female

Male
Total
1
2
12

Years

6
11
13
13
5
3

5
6
4
1

18
19
9
4

1

3
2

5
5
2

5
5

1

1

5
2

1
9
3

3
1
2

1
6
6

17

Mos.

2

2
4

3

7
.

5
10

7
5
2

Average Hospital Life
Female
Years
Mos.

Total
Years

Mos.

1
1
1
1

3

3
2
1
6

6
6
1
3

3

2
1
1

5
3
11

2
2
2

1
5
1
0

5

Unknown
Total

61

34

95

11

JTJ

h*
P

Q
**

c

o
h-l

5;
3

1

5
3

7

6

7

5
11
6

1

11

55 - 59
1
60 - 64
65 - 69
70 & over

1

K!

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

IX - DEATHS AND YEARS OP HOSPITAL LIFE

Deaths occurring in the colony during the four year period
ending December 31, 1934 are divided in this table according to the
ages at which death occurred. The average number of years during
which each group has been on the institution books is also included.
About half of these deaths occurred among patients less than 35 years
old.
With the average time on the books of six years and ten months
for the 348 who died and with an average of two years and six months
for the 95 patients discharged, there is shown a general average life
of five years and 10.8 months for the total of 443 who died or were
discharged in the four year period.

X- CAUSES OP DEATH

For the total of 348 deaths listed in the four years from 1931
to 1934 inclusive are given the causes according to the International
List, published by the Census Bureau.
In addition to the 212 ascribed to epilepsy, the principal
other causes include tuberculosis, pneumonia and heart disease, in the
order named.

44

DEATHS DURING 4 YEAR PERIOD 1931 - 1934

Table IX
Total Deaths

0 - 4
5 - 9
10 - 14
15 - 19

80 - 24
25 - 29

Male

Female

Total

3
11

2
1
13
13

5
12
30
32

15
16

40
42

15
14

31

17
19
85

Average Hospital Life
Female

Male
Years

Months

Years

3

1
2

9
5
3

4
6
11
6

5
5
4
10

3
7

11

1
3
2
6

9
5
12

8
3

30 - 34
35 - 39

26
16
10

40
45
50
55

16
6
17
5

13
11
12
10

29
17
29
15

9
5
12

6

15
11

11

8

11

8

16

9

11
1

7

197

151

-

44
49
54
59

60 - 64
65 - 69
70 and over
Unknown
Total

6
4

24

348

a

12
7

8

a

a

a

Months

1
1
5

a

Total
Years

Months

2
8

1
2

10
9

4
6

2

2
0
7

9
7

9
10

2
10

10
6
12

a

10

6
10
1
9
9

11

I
H
H

8

3
3

a
11
a

5
10

8

9

3

10

O
2
Kl

MICHIGAN STATE HOSPITALS

Table X
TOTAL DEATHS 1931

to 1934

INCLUSIVE GIVING CAUSES OF DEATH

Causes of Death

Male

Tuberculosis of Respiratory System
Tuberculosis o f other organs
Other Infectious Diseases
Cancer a n d other Malignant Tumors
Other General Diseases

15
2
3
2
1

Diseases of Blood and Blood Making Organs
Chronic Poisoning

1
Epilepsy
110
Other Diseases o f Nervous System
5
Endocarditis
4
Other Diseases of the Heart
Other Diseases o f Circulatory System
Broncho Pneumonia
Pneumonia (lobar, unspecified)
Other Diseases o f Respiratory System

Female
14
1
4
1
102
2
6

Total
29
3
3
6
1
1
1
212
7
10

11
1
17
4
2

1
2
3
6
1

12
3
20
10
3

Diseases o f Digestive System
Nephritis
Diseases o f Bones
Gangrene
Congenital Malformations

2
4
1
1
2

2
3
1
1

4
7
2
1
3

Diseases of Early Childhood
Senility
Accidental Deaths
Cause Unknown

1
1
5
2

1

1
1
5
3

151

348

Total

46

197

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