Virtual Tour of the Peninsula Community Library’s Johnson-Carroll Local History Room

Dublin Core

Title

Virtual Tour of the Peninsula Community Library’s Johnson-Carroll Local History Room

Subject

Old Mission Peninsula (Mich.)

Description

A virtual tour of the contents of the Peninsula Community LIbrary’s Local History Room. Hear the “coming to the Peninsula” story of the Johnson-Carroll family, and learn the history behind the room’s ancestral furnishings.

Creator

Mary Morgan

Source

Local History Collection, Peninsula Community Library, Traverse City, MI

Publisher

Peninsula Community Library

Date

December 2020

Contributor

E. Timothy Carroll, Mike Eichner of Eichner Productions, Frank Kidd of Frank Kidd Photography, Karen Lueck of A Moment Captured, Mary T. Morgan of PCL.

Rights

This document is protected by copyright law. Contact the Peninsula Community Library for permission to reproduce, display, or transmit this document.

Relation

Peninsula Family History records

Format

Video, MP4

Language

English

Type

Moving image

Coverage

Peninsula Township, Grand Traverse County, Michigan

PDF Text

Text

Welcome visitor:
Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Tim Carroll and I am the sponsor of the Johnson-Carroll Local History Room (LHR). The room is named for my father’s side of the family who were among the earliest Europeans to settle here. In this room, in addition to the fine collection of printed books and archives, there are also numerous furnishings that were owned by them. I would like to walk you through the room and provide the provenance behind each piece.
Start at the little table, just inside the door, and pick up the framed photo. In that picture you will see a family that includes an ancient lady sitting in a chair. The platform rocker next to the table is the same chair, though recently restored. The lady is Mary Keziah Rice Johnson, who married Richard Johnson, in Traverse City, on October 4, 1854 when Richard was fresh off the boat from Ireland. Theirs was the 8th marriage license issued in Grand Traverse County. Although not in the Local History Room, this is the much treasured box which Richard Johnson carried from Ireland, under his arm, containing all of his worldly possessions as he made his way to America. They received a deed for 160 acres on this peninsula, just a mile north of where you are standing, on April 15, 1864, during the Lincoln Administration. They were my great grandparents and I now live in the house they built that summer.
Next to Mary’s chair, in the photo, is a bookstand holding her Bible. That book has been lost to history but the stand survived and presently holds a large dictionary from the same era.
Look closely at the photo again. In the far-right hand side you can see a corner of Mary’s writing desk. In the picture it is closed, but if you walk over to it you will find it open. When I cleaned it out a few years ago, I found, wedged behind the pigeonholes, a ½ cent U.S. postage stamp dated, I presume, from the earliest days of their marriage.
Laying on the desk is a copy of a land deed from 1864. Note the Lincoln signature in the lower right side. The other paper is our family tree. You will see the Johnson’s in the top row.
Look back to the wall above Mary’s chair. The large picture there is Richard Johnson, her husband. It was taken on their 40th wedding anniversary in 1894.
The door, which hangs on the wall opposite Mary’s chair, is an etched-glass front door, popular during their era. It would open into a parlor, a room kept for special occasions, especially for wakes. The door was wide enough to accommodate a coffin. The picture etched into the door is especially appropriate: an angel, holding out two cherries on stems, to be dropped into the apron that a little girl is holding open in anticipation of this gracious treat from above. Growing cherries was the main source of income for the generations who lived on Sunny Slope Farm, the name Mary K. Johnson chose for the original farm.
Now walk back to the little table where you started. The clock on the table came into our family, as a wedding gift, when Mary’s youngest child, Daisy Isabel, married Alex Carroll on May 31, 1900 in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, which, at the time, was across the road from the family homestead. The Johnson farm was deeded to Alex on their wedding day. Glance at the photo on the table. That is Alex, holding baby Ethel, with Daisy standing by their first born, Ivah, and my father, Frederick Edward, playing on the floor. I’m guessing the picture was taken at Christmas, 1910. Mary died two years later.
Alex’s family also came to the Peninsula from Ireland, via Canada. My great-great-grandfather, Patrick Carroll, came from County Louth, where he married Rose Englishby on January 4, 1803. They migrated to a farm near Guelph, Ontario, and their first born, Peter, married Dorothy Stevens, and they had 11 sons and a daughter. Their first-born son, Edward, married Jane Holman, in Elora, Ontario, and they migrated to the Peninsula, in the late 1850’s, and homesteaded 160 acres on what is now Carroll Road, two miles south of the library. Alex was their middle son. Walk back to Mary’s writing desk to view their photos on the family tree.
Alex and Daisy lived on the Johnson farm (Sunny Slope), where they raised 5 girls and a boy, my father, known always as Fred. The farm was passed on to Fred, where he and his wife Norma raised two daughters and two sons. A mink ranch and a Christmas tree plantation were added to the fruit farm. I am his last living son.
So thank you for dropping in, and we hope that you will come back soon.
PENINSULA COMMUNITY LIBRARY SPECIAL THANKS:
E. Timothy Carroll for his kind donation funding the Peninsula Community Library’s Local History Room (LHR) and the script and narration he provided that made this video possible.
Frank Kidd, Frank Kidd Photography, for his gifted work on the interior shots of the LHR, which added greatly to the telling of this story. Frank@FrankKidd.com
Karen S. Lueck, A Moment Captured, for the exterior shot of the PCL and the photo of Tim Carroll. karenslueck@gmail.com
Vicki Shurly, Director of Peninsula Community Library (PCL) for supporting our efforts to expand the reach of the PCL LHR.
Mike Eichner, Eichner Production Management, for his time and talent bringing this video to life.
Production by Mary T. Morgan (mmorgan@tadl.org), PCL LHR librarian.
Sunny Slope Farm today (picture).






Moving Image Item Type Metadata

Transcription

Welcome visitor:
Allow me to introduce myself. My name is Tim Carroll and I am the sponsor of the Johnson-Carroll Local History Room (LHR). The room is named for my father’s side of the family who were among the earliest Europeans to settle here. In this room, in addition to the fine collection of printed books and archives, there are also numerous furnishings that were owned by them. I would like to walk you through the room and provide the provenance behind each piece.
Start at the little table, just inside the door, and pick up the framed photo. In that picture you will see a family that includes an ancient lady sitting in a chair. The platform rocker next to the table is the same chair, though recently restored. The lady is Mary Keziah Rice Johnson, who married Richard Johnson, in Traverse City, on October 4, 1854 when Richard was fresh off the boat from Ireland. Theirs was the 8th marriage license issued in Grand Traverse County. Although not in the Local History Room, this is the much treasured box which Richard Johnson carried from Ireland, under his arm, containing all of his worldly possessions as he made his way to America. They received a deed for 160 acres on this peninsula, just a mile north of where you are standing, on April 15, 1864, during the Lincoln Administration. They were my great grandparents and I now live in the house they built that summer.
Next to Mary’s chair, in the photo, is a bookstand holding her Bible. That book has been lost to history but the stand survived and presently holds a large dictionary from the same era.
Look closely at the photo again. In the far-right hand side you can see a corner of Mary’s writing desk. In the picture it is closed, but if you walk over to it you will find it open. When I cleaned it out a few years ago, I found, wedged behind the pigeonholes, a ½ cent U.S. postage stamp dated, I presume, from the earliest days of their marriage.
Laying on the desk is a copy of a land deed from 1864. Note the Lincoln signature in the lower right side. The other paper is our family tree. You will see the Johnson’s in the top row.
Look back to the wall above Mary’s chair. The large picture there is Richard Johnson, her husband. It was taken on their 40th wedding anniversary in 1894.
The door, which hangs on the wall opposite Mary’s chair, is an etched-glass front door, popular during their era. It would open into a parlor, a room kept for special occasions, especially for wakes. The door was wide enough to accommodate a coffin. The picture etched into the door is especially appropriate: an angel, holding out two cherries on stems, to be dropped into the apron that a little girl is holding open in anticipation of this gracious treat from above. Growing cherries was the main source of income for the generations who lived on Sunny Slope Farm, the name Mary K. Johnson chose for the original farm.
Now walk back to the little table where you started. The clock on the table came into our family, as a wedding gift, when Mary’s youngest child, Daisy Isabel, married Alex Carroll on May 31, 1900 in St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, which, at the time, was across the road from the family homestead. The Johnson farm was deeded to Alex on their wedding day. Glance at the photo on the table. That is Alex, holding baby Ethel, with Daisy standing by their first born, Ivah, and my father, Frederick Edward, playing on the floor. I’m guessing the picture was taken at Christmas, 1910. Mary died two years later.
Alex’s family also came to the Peninsula from Ireland, via Canada. My great-great-grandfather, Patrick Carroll, came from County Louth, where he married Rose Englishby on January 4, 1803. They migrated to a farm near Guelph, Ontario, and their first born, Peter, married Dorothy Stevens, and they had 11 sons and a daughter. Their first-born son, Edward, married Jane Holman, in Elora, Ontario, and they migrated to the Peninsula, in the late 1850’s, and homesteaded 160 acres on what is now Carroll Road, two miles south of the library. Alex was their middle son. Walk back to Mary’s writing desk to view their photos on the family tree.
Alex and Daisy lived on the Johnson farm (Sunny Slope), where they raised 5 girls and a boy, my father, known always as Fred. The farm was passed on to Fred, where he and his wife Norma raised two daughters and two sons. A mink ranch and a Christmas tree plantation were added to the fruit farm. I am his last living son.
So thank you for dropping in, and we hope that you will come back soon.
PENINSULA COMMUNITY LIBRARY SPECIAL THANKS:
E. Timothy Carroll for his kind donation funding the Peninsula Community Library’s Local History Room (LHR) and the script and narration he provided that made this video possible.
Frank Kidd, Frank Kidd Photography, for his gifted work on the interior shots of the LHR, which added greatly to the telling of this story. Frank@FrankKidd.com
Karen S. Lueck, A Moment Captured, for the exterior shot of the PCL and the photo of Tim Carroll. karenslueck@gmail.com
Vicki Shurly, Director of Peninsula Community Library (PCL) for supporting our efforts to expand the reach of the PCL LHR.
Mike Eichner, Eichner Production Management, for his time and talent bringing this video to life.
Production by Mary T. Morgan (mmorgan@tadl.org), PCL LHR librarian.
Sunny Slope Farm today (picture).






Original Format

Moving image

Duration

7 minutes, 12 seconds

Compression

MP4

Producer

Mary T. Morgan

Director

Mary T Morgan

Item Relations

This item has no relations.